Lev Manovich
[Artist, theorist, and critic, b. 1960, Moscow, lives in New York.]

 ... the reason we think that computer graphics technology has succeeded in faking reality is that we, over the course of the last hundred and fifty years, have come to accept the image of photography and film as reality. 

Jean Baudrillard
[Writer and theorist, b. 1929, Reims, France, d. 2007, Paris.]

 Digital production erases the image as analogon; it erases the real as something capable of being ‘imagined’. 

Tacita Dean
[Artist, b. 1960, Canterbury, England, lives in Berlin.]

 I don’t know if we will have the same level of longing for a digital iPhone picture as we will for a gelatin-silver print. 

Joan Fontcuberta
[Photographer, b. 1955, Barcelona, lives in Barcelona.]

 The dramatic metamorphosis from the grain of silver to the pixel represents nothing more than a screen that conceals the evolution taking place in the whole framework that provided photography with a cultural, instrumental, and historical context. 

Danny Lyon
[Photographer, b. 1942, New York, lives in Ulster County, New York.]

 The sign at the entrance to my gym locker room says, “no cell phones please, cell phones are cameras.” They are not. A camera is a Nikon or a Leica or Rolleiflex, and when you strike someone with one, they know they have been hit with something substantial. 

Andreas Gursky
[Photographer, b. 1955, Leipzig, Germany, lives in Dusseldorf.]

 Since the photographic medium has been digitized, a fixed definition of the term “photography” has become impossible. 

David Maisel
[Photographer, b. 1961, New York, lives in San Francisco.]

 The limits of photography have always existed in a changing, fluid dynamic form. Cameras, lenses, papers, films, and, yes, digital technologies come and go. They are the current on which photography rides, but not the substance of what makes a photograph a worthy work of art. 

Geoffrey Batchen
[Photohistorian, b. 1956, Australia, lives in Wellington, New Zealand.]

 The main difference seems to be that, whereas photography still claims some sort of objectivity, digital imaging is an overtly fictional process. As a practice that is known to be capable of nothing but fabrication, digitization abandons even the rhetoric of truth that has been such an important part of photography’s cultural success. 
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