Vincent Van Gogh
[Artist, b. 1853, Zundert, Netherlands, d. 1890, Auvers-sur-Oise, France.]

 I always think photographs abominable, and I don’t like to have them around, particularly not those of persons I know and love... photographic portraits wither much sooner than we ourselves do, whereas the painted portrait is a thing which is felt, done with love or respect for the human being that is portrayed. 

Ellen von Unwerth
[Photographer, b. 1954, Frankfurt, Germany, lives in New York.]

 I don’t stand behind the camera drooling. Knowing that, the models are more likely to open up and relax. 

Paul Virilio
[Writer and theorist, b. 1932, Paris, lives in La Rochelle, France.]

 [When everything becomes visible,] we’ll dream of being blind. This is the engine of art. 

Inez Van Lamsweerde
[Photographer, b. 1963, Amsterdam, Netherlands, lives in Amsterdam.]

 My works have nothing to do with reality. I am not interested in a version of daily reality. The works show a new mental world. 

Bill Viola
[Artist, b. 1951, New York City, lives in Los Angeles.]

 The electronic image is not fixed to any material base and, like our DNA, it has become a code that can circulate to any container that will hold it, defying death as it travels at the speed of light. 

Massimo Vitali
[Photographer, b. 1944, Como, Italy, lives in Lucca, Italy.]

 Photography is like a river with a thousand streams that never converge. 

John Vachon
[Photographer, b. 1914, St. Paul, Minnesota, d. 1975, New York.]

 One morning I photographed a grain elevator: pure sun-brushed silo columns of cement rising from behind CB&Q freight car. The genius of Walker Evans and Charles Sheeler welded into one supreme photographic statement, I told myself. Then it occurred to me that it was I who was looking at the grain elevator. For the past year I had been sedulously aping the masters. And in Omaha I realized that I had developed my own style with the camera. I knew that I would photograph only what pleased me or astonished my eye, and only in the way I saw it. 

Carole Vance
[Anthropologist, lives in New York.]

 Heirs to a Victorian cultural tradition that regarded sexual pleasure with profound suspicion, we greet explicit images of sexuality with anxiety and an undeveloped history of looking. Distinctions that viewers are accustomed to making—between fantasy and behavior, image and reality—become curiously evanescent when it comes to sex. Our unease increases if the sexual acts are unfamiliar or unconventional...