Vincent Van Gogh
[Artist, b. 1853, Zundert, Netherlands, d. 1890, Auvers-sur-Oise, France.]

 I always think photographs abominable, and I don’t like to have them around, particularly not those of persons I know and love... photographic portraits wither much sooner than we ourselves do, whereas the painted portrait is a thing which is felt, done with love or respect for the human being that is portrayed. 

Ellen von Unwerth
[Photographer, b. 1954, Frankfurt, Germany, lives in New York.]

 I like to photograph anyone before they know what their best angles are. 

Bill Viola
[Artist, b. 1951, New York City, lives in Los Angeles.]

 The electronic image is not fixed to any material base and, like our DNA, it has become a code that can circulate to any container that will hold it, defying death as it travels at the speed of light. 

Gore Vidal
[Writer, b. 1925, West Point, New York, lives in Ravello, Italy and Los Angeles.]

 For half a century photography has been the “art form” of the untalented. Obviously some pictures are more satisfactory than others, but where is credit due? To the designer of the camera? To the finger on the button? To the law of averages? 

Massimo Vitali
[Photographer, b. 1944, Como, Italy, lives in Lucca, Italy.]

 Photography is like a river with a thousand streams that never converge. 

Paul Valéry
[Writer and poet, b. 1871, Sète, France, d. 1945, Paris.]

 To see is to forget the name of the thing one sees. 

Paul Virilio
[Writer and theorist, b. 1932, Paris, lives in La Rochelle, France.]

 ... the blinding Hiroshima flash... literally photographed the shadow cast by beings and things, so that every surface immediately became war’s recording surface, its film. 

James Van Der Zee
[Photographer, b. 1886, Lenox, Massachusetts, d. 1983, Washington, D.C.]

 Being an artist, I had an artist’s instinct. Why, you have an advantage over the average photographer. You can see the picture before its taken; then it’s up to you to get the camera to see it.