Ellen von Unwerth
[Photographer, b. 1954, Frankfurt, Germany, lives in New York.]

 I don’t stand behind the camera drooling. Knowing that, the models are more likely to open up and relax. 

Dziga Vertov
[Artist and filmmaker, b. 1896, Bialystok, d. 1954, Moscow.]

 I’m an eye. A mechanical eye. I, the machine, show you a world the way only I can see it. I free myself for today and forever from human immobility... My way leads towards the creation of a fresh perception of the world. Thus I explain in a new way the world unknown to you. (1923) 

John Vachon
[Photographer, b. 1914, St. Paul, Minnesota, d. 1975, New York.]

 One morning I photographed a grain elevator: pure sun-brushed silo columns of cement rising from behind CB&Q freight car. The genius of Walker Evans and Charles Sheeler welded into one supreme photographic statement, I told myself. Then it occurred to me that it was I who was looking at the grain elevator. For the past year I had been sedulously aping the masters. And in Omaha I realized that I had developed my own style with the camera. I knew that I would photograph only what pleased me or astonished my eye, and only in the way I saw it. 

Gore Vidal
[Writer, b. 1925, West Point, New York, lives in Ravello, Italy and Los Angeles.]

 For half a century photography has been the “art form” of the untalented. Obviously some pictures are more satisfactory than others, but where is credit due? To the designer of the camera? To the finger on the button? To the law of averages? 

Massimo Vitali
[Photographer, b. 1944, Como, Italy, lives in Lucca, Italy.]

 Photography is like a river with a thousand streams that never converge. 

Bill Viola
[Artist, b. 1951, New York City, lives in Los Angeles.]

 The electronic image is not fixed to any material base and, like our DNA, it has become a code that can circulate to any container that will hold it, defying death as it travels at the speed of light. 

Édouard Vuillard
[Painter, b. 1868, Cuiseaux, Saône-et-Loire, France, d. 1940, La Baule, Loire-Atlantique, France.]

 It is clear that the “Good” and the “Beautiful” have passed out of fashion—as the “True,” photography has shown us its nature and limitations: registering phenomena as a pure effect of their existence, requiring as little man as possible. (1896) 

James Van Der Zee
[Photographer, b. 1886, Lenox, Massachusetts, d. 1983, Washington, D.C.]

 Being an artist, I had an artist’s instinct. Why, you have an advantage over the average photographer. You can see the picture before its taken; then it’s up to you to get the camera to see it.