Cindy Sherman
[Artist, b. 1954, Glen Ridge, New Jersey, lives in New York.]

 Once I set up, the camera starts clicking, then I just start to move and watch how I move in the mirror. It’s not like I’m method acting or anything. I don’t feel that I am that person. I may be thinking about a certain story or situation, but I don’t become her. There’s this distance. The image in the mirror becomes her—the image the camera gets on the film. And the one thing I’ve always known is that the camera lies. 

R. Crumb
[Cartoonist, b. 1943, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, lives in Sauve, France.]

 They were just snapshots, nothing special, nothing particularly artistic. They were used for utility purposes.
(On photographs of mundane streetscapes he had “Stanley Something-or-other” take in Sacramento in 1988 to serve as backgrounds to his cartoons. “People don’t draw it, all this crap, people don’t focus attention on it because it’s ugly, it’s bleak, it’s depressing... But, this is the world we live in; I wanted my work to reflect that, the background reality of urban life.”) 

Jean Baudrillard
[Writer and theorist, b. 1929, Reims, France, d. 2007, Paris.]

 Every photographed object is merely the trace left behind by the disappearance of all the rest. It is an almost perfect crime, an almost total resolution of the world, which merely leave the illusion of a particular object shining forth, the image of which then becomes an impenetrable enigma. 

Patti Smith
[Musician, artist, and writer, b. 1946, Chicago, Illinois, lives in Detroit and New York.]

 I love to photograph the tools of one’s trade: Duncan Grant’s paintbrushes, the typewriter of Herman Hesse, or even my own guitar, a 1957 Fender Duo-Sonic. 

Imogen Cunningham
[Photographer, b. 1883, Portland, d. 1976, San Francisco.]

 I never divide photographers into creative and uncreative, I just call them photographers. Who is creative? How do you know who is creative or not? 

Paul Virilio
[Writer and theorist, b. 1932, Paris, lives in La Rochelle, France.]

 To regain our liberty (and our distance), we must slow the images down. 

Glenn Ligon
[Artist, b. 1960, Bronx, New York, lives in New York.]

 The impulse to reuse, recycle, and recontextualize is nothing new. What is new is the overabundance of images we have to choose from. The task is to see whether something can be made from them. I do not wish to add any more. (2012) 

John Baldessari
[Artist, b. 1931, National City, California, lives in Venice, California.]

 What got me interested in found imagery was that it was not considered art, but just imagery, and I began dumpster diving in photo shops.