Larry Clark
[Photographer and filmmaker, b. 1943, Tulsa, Oklahoma, lives in New York.]

 [Eugene Smith] was always writing these diatribes about truth, and how he wanted to tell the truth, the truth, the truth. It was a real rebel position. It was kind of like a teenager’s position: why can’t things be like they should be? Why can’t I do what I want? I latched on to that philosophy. One day I snapped, hey, you know, I know a story that no one’s ever told, never seen, and I’ve lived it. It’s my own story and my friends’ story. 

Susan Meiselas
[Photographer, b. 1948, Baltimore, Maryland, lives in New York.]

 If Instagram had been available when I was working in Nicaragua in 1978, I’m sure I would have wanted to use it as a way of reporting directly from the streets during the insurrection. 

Lev Manovich
[Artist, theorist, and critic, b. 1960, Moscow, lives in New York.]

 Once we came to accept the photographic image as reality, the way to its future simulation was open. 

Lucy Lippard
[Critic and writer, b. 1936, New York, lives in Galisteo, New Mexico.]

 There is indeed something omnivorous about the act of photography. It offers a way of responding to everything about everything. 

Robert Heinecken
[Photographer, b. 1931, Denver, d. 2006, Albuquerque, New Mexico.]

 I am interested in what I term gestalts; picture circumstances which bring together disparate images or ideas so as to form new meanings and new configurations. 

Cindy Sherman
[Artist, b. 1954, Glen Ridge, New Jersey, lives in New York.]

 Once I set up, the camera starts clicking, then I just start to move and watch how I move in the mirror. It’s not like I’m method acting or anything. I don’t feel that I am that person. I may be thinking about a certain story or situation, but I don’t become her. There’s this distance. The image in the mirror becomes her—the image the camera gets on the film. And the one thing I’ve always known is that the camera lies. 

William Wegman
[Artist, b. 1943, Holyoke, Massachusetts, lives in New York.]

 I just imagined you were a camera. 

Abbas (Abbas Attar)
[Photographer, b. 1944, Iran, d. 2018, Paris.]

 There are two ways to think about photography: one is writing with light, and the other is drawing with light.