Anne Frank
[Writer, b. 1929, Frankfurt, Germany, d. 1945, Bergen-Belsen concentration camp, Germany.]

 This is a photo as I would wish myself to look all the time. Then I would maybe have a chance to come to Hollywood. (10, October, 1942; Handwritten inscription on a photograph) 

Martine Franck
[Photographer, b. 1938, Antwerp, Belgium, d. 2012, Paris.]

 My grandfather killed himself falling off the dike in Ostend while photographing my two cousins. This can happen so easily when looking through a lens: for a split second nothing else exists outside the frame. 

Joan Fontcuberta
[Photographer, b. 1955, Barcelona, lives in Barcelona.]

 There are religions in which the representation of the world is banned as an usurpation of the power of a God, creator of all things. It is very possible that photography is a trick of the devil and each shot is a sin. 

Judy Fiskin
[Photographer, b. 1945, Chicago, lives in Los Angeles.]

 In my work, the information is the least important part. It’s there, and the work wouldn’t mean the same thing without it, but it isn’t structured around the information. The most interesting part to me is the visual play... looking at this little universe of representation that I can make out of the world. 

Andreas Feininger
[Photographer, b. 1906, Paris, France, d. 1999, New York.]

 Experience has shown that the more fascinating the subject, the less observant the photographer. 

Adam Fuss
[Photographer, b. 1961, London, lives in New York.]

 An echo is a good way to describe the photogram, which is a visual echo of the real object. That's why I like to work with the photogram, because the contact with what is represented is actual. It's as if the border between the world and the print is osmotic. 

Donna Ferrato
[Photographer, b. 1949, Waltham, Massachusetts, lives in New York.]

 Not for me the uninvolved wanderer with a camera—some invisible alien, coldly holding a tin box without a heart. My camera has feelings. 

Harold Feinstein
[Photographer, b. 1931, Brooklyn, New York, lives in New York.]

 On one hand you want to see your subject well. On the other hand, you want to be caught off guard to retain the spontaneity. If you know your subject too well you stop seeing it.