Larry Fink
[Photographer, b. 1941, Brooklyn, New York, lives in Martins Creek, Pennsylvania.]

 My picture-making process is not so much about making a photograph as it is about paying extreme attention to what I’m most attracted to, what is drawing my interest. For the most part, I’m hyperstimulated at all times; my life is a massive run-on sentence of stimulation. 

E.M. Forster
[Writer, b. 1879, London, d. 1970, Coventry, England.]

 Even a fellow with a camera has his favourite subjects, as we can see looking through the Kodak-albums of our friends. One amateur prefers the family group, another bathing scenes, another cows upon an alp, or kittens held upside down in the arms of a black-faced child. The tendency to choose one subject rather than another indicates the photographer’s temperament. Nevertheless, his passion is for photography rather than for selection, a kitten will serve when no cows are available... 

Robbert Flick
[Photographer, b. 1939, Amersfoort, Holland, lives in Los Angeles, California.]

 Serendipity plays an enormous role in my work. I create the possibilities for accidents to happen. 

Harold Feinstein
[Photographer, b. 1931, Brooklyn, New York, lives in New York.]

 On one hand you want to see your subject well. On the other hand, you want to be caught off guard to retain the spontaneity. If you know your subject too well you stop seeing it. 

Buckminster Fuller
[Inventor and philosopher, b. 1895, Milton, Massachusetts, d. 1983, Los Angeles.]

 Seeing-is-believing is a blind spot in man’s vision. 

Lee Friedlander
[Photographer, b. 1934, Aberdeen, Washington, lives in New York.]

 I suspect it is for one’s self-interest that one looks at one’s surroundings and one’s self. This search is personally born and is indeed my reason and motive for making photographs. The camera is not merely a reflecting pool and the photographs are not exactly the mirror, mirror on the wall that speaks with a twisted tongue. Witness is borne and puzzles come together at the photographic moment which is very simple and complete. The mind-finger presses the release on the silly machine and it stops time and holds what its jaws can encompass and what the light will stain. 

Gustave Flaubert
[Writer, b. 1821, Rouen, Seine-Maritime, France, d. 1880, Rouen, France.]

 DAGUERREOTYPE Will take the place of painting. (See PHOTOGRAPHY.) (From “The Dictionary of Received Ideas,” assembled from notes Flaubert made in the 1870s.) 

William Faulkner
[Writer, b. 1897, New Albany, Mississippi, d. 1962, Oxford, Mississippi.]

 No photographs, no recorded documents. (His vow to keep his “refuse” out of history)