Francis Frith
[Photographer, b. 1822, Chesterfield, Derbyshire, England, d. 1898, Cannes, France.]

 Every stone, every little perfection, or dilapidation, the most minute detail, which, on an ordinary drawing, would merit no special attention, becomes, on a photograph, worthy of careful study. 

E.M. Forster
[Writer, b. 1879, London, d. 1970, Coventry, England.]

 Even a fellow with a camera has his favourite subjects, as we can see looking through the Kodak-albums of our friends. One amateur prefers the family group, another bathing scenes, another cows upon an alp, or kittens held upside down in the arms of a black-faced child. The tendency to choose one subject rather than another indicates the photographer’s temperament. Nevertheless, his passion is for photography rather than for selection, a kitten will serve when no cows are available... 

Giséle Freund
[Photographer, b. 1908, Berlin, Germany, d. 2000, Paris, France.]

 The lens, that allegedly impartial eye, permits all possible distortions of reality... The importance of photography lies not only in the fact that it is a creation, but above all in the fact that it is one of the most effective means of shaping our ideas and influencing our behavior. 

Judy Fiskin
[Photographer, b. 1945, Chicago, lives in Los Angeles.]

 In my work, the information is the least important part. It’s there, and the work wouldn’t mean the same thing without it, but it isn’t structured around the information. The most interesting part to me is the visual play... looking at this little universe of representation that I can make out of the world. 

Horst Faas
[Photojournalist, b. 1933, Berlin, Germany, d. 2012, Munich, Germany.]

 I think the best war photos I have taken have always been made when a battle was actually taking place—when people were confused and scared and courageous and stupid and showed all these things. When you look at people right at the very moment of truth, everything is quite human. You take a picture at this moment with all the mistakes in it, with everything that might be confusing to the reader, but that’s the right combat photo. 

Andreas Feininger
[Photographer, b. 1906, Paris, France, d. 1999, New York.]

 Experience has shown that the more fascinating the subject, the less observant the photographer. 

Vilém Flusser
[Writer and philosopher, b. 1920, Prague, Czechoslovakia, d. 1991, Prague.]

 Photographers, it is true, do not work but they do do something: They create, process, and store symbols. 

Harold Feinstein
[Photographer, b. 1931, Brooklyn, New York, lives in New York.]

 On one hand you want to see your subject well. On the other hand, you want to be caught off guard to retain the spontaneity. If you know your subject too well you stop seeing it.