Robert Frank
[Photographer and filmmaker, b. 1924, Zürich, Switzerland, lives in Mabou, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, Canada, and New York.]

 The truth is somewhere between the documentary and the fictional, and that is what I try to show. What is real one moment has become imaginary the next. You believe what you see now, and the next second you don’t anymore. 

Athol Fugard
[Playright, b. 1932, Middelburg, South Africa, lives in San Diego, California and South Africa.]

 You call that work? Click-click with a camera. Are you mad? 

Horst Faas
[Photojournalist, b. 1933, Berlin, Germany, d. 2012, Munich, Germany.]

 I think the best war photos I have taken have always been made when a battle was actually taking place—when people were confused and scared and courageous and stupid and showed all these things. When you look at people right at the very moment of truth, everything is quite human. You take a picture at this moment with all the mistakes in it, with everything that might be confusing to the reader, but that’s the right combat photo. 

Gustave Flaubert
[Writer, b. 1821, Rouen, Seine-Maritime, France, d. 1880, Rouen, France.]

 DAGUERREOTYPE Will take the place of painting. (See PHOTOGRAPHY.) (From “The Dictionary of Received Ideas,” assembled from notes Flaubert made in the 1870s.) 

Donna Ferrato
[Photographer, b. 1949, Waltham, Massachusetts, lives in New York.]

 Not for me the uninvolved wanderer with a camera—some invisible alien, coldly holding a tin box without a heart. My camera has feelings. 

Harold Feinstein
[Photographer, b. 1931, Brooklyn, New York, lives in New York.]

 On one hand you want to see your subject well. On the other hand, you want to be caught off guard to retain the spontaneity. If you know your subject too well you stop seeing it. 

John Paul Filo
[Photographer, b. 1948, Natrona Heights, Pennsylvania, lives in New York.]

 I didn’t react visually. This girl came up and knelt over the body and let out a God-awful scream that made me click the camera. (On photographing Mary Vecchio with slain student Jeffery Miller during the shootings of students at Kent State, April, 1970.) 

William Faulkner
[Writer, b. 1897, New Albany, Mississippi, d. 1962, Oxford, Mississippi.]

 No photographs, no recorded documents. (His vow to keep his “refuse” out of history)