Laurie Simmons
[Photographer, b. 1949, Long Island, New York, lives in New York.]

 I think of scientific veracity as an idea from the past—the scientists say it is so, the photo is proof. Even the authoritative power of the word “actual”—an actual what? An actual retouched photo, an actual collaged photo? 

Errol Morris
[Documentary filmmaker, b. 1948, Hewlett, New York, lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts.]

 Photography can lead us astray, we can be tricked by ocular proof. And photography—and I believe this is the right verb—can entice us into error. 

Chuck Close
[Artist, b. 1940, Monroe, Washington, lives in New York.]

 When I went to pick [artist Joe Zucker] up to photograph him, I didn’t recognize him. He has curly, blonde, bushy hair—but he had bought a jar of Vaseline, greased his hair down, borrowed someone’s white shirt and tie, someone else’s glasses, and he looked like a used car salesman. He understood that all he had to do was provide me with the evidence that someone like that existed for a 100th of a second. It didn’t necessarily have to be him. 

Geoffrey Batchen
[Photohistorian, b. 1956, Australia, lives in Wellington, New Zealand.]

 The main difference seems to be that, whereas photography still claims some sort of objectivity, digital imaging is an overtly fictional process. As a practice that is known to be capable of nothing but fabrication, digitization abandons even the rhetoric of truth that has been such an important part of photography’s cultural success. 

Glenn Ligon
[Artist, b. 1960, Bronx, New York, lives in New York.]

 Even with a million cameras, there’s no such thing—for certain groups of citizens—as evidence. 

Gerhard Richter
[Artist, b. 1932, Dresden, lives in Düsseldorf.]

 The photograph is the only picture that can truly convey information, even if it is technically faulty and the object can barely be identified. A painting of a murder is of no interest whatever; but a photograph of a murder fascinates everyone. 

Rosalind Krauss
[Writer, critic, and historian, b. 1941, Washington, D.C., lives in New York.]

 ... photography is an imprint or transfer off the real; it is a photochemically processed trace causally connected to the thing in the world to which it refers in a manner parallel to fingerprints or footprints or the rings of water that cold glasses leave on tables. The photograph is thus generically distinct from painting or sculpture or drawing. On the family tree of images it is closer to palm prints, death masks, the Shroud of Turin, or the tracks of gulls on beaches. 

James Agee
[Writer, b. 1909, Knoxville, Tennessee, d. 1955, New York.]

 It is clear enough by now to most people that “the camera never lies” is a foolish saying. Yet it is doubtful whether most people realize how extraordinarily slippery a liar the camera is. 
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