Brett Weston
[Photographer, b. 1911, Los Angeles, d. 1993, Kona, Hawaii.]

 Anything more than 500 yds from the car just isn’t photogenic. 

Albert Watson
[Photographer, b. 1942, Edinburgh, Scotland, lives in New York.]

 Really good portraiture is a two-way street where someone is throwing little gems out and you’re grabbing them. Very few people have a 100 percent fluency in being able to do to do this—this kind of magical reaction with a camera. 

Minor White
[Photographer, writer, and theorist, b. 1908, Minneapolis, Minnesota, d. 1976, Cambridge, Massachusetts.]

 The camera is first a means of self-discovery and a means of self-growth. The artist has one thing to say—himself. 

Orson Welles
[Filmmaker, b. 1915, Kenosha, Wisconsin, d. 1985, Hollywood, California.]

 The camera is much more than a recording apparatus. It is a medium via which messages reach us from another world. 

Jamie Wyeth
[Artist, b. 1946, Wilmington, Delaware, lives in Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania.]

 When painting portraits a lot of people say, “Why not get a photograph of the person?” Photography is wonderful and it is an art form in itself, but... my portrait is a culmination of elements... a truer image of a person than just the ‘click’ of a snapshot. 

Peter Wollen
[Writer, theorist, filmmaker, b. 1938, London, lives in Los Angeles.]

 The aesthetic discussion of photography is dominated by the concept of time. Photographs appear as devices stopping time and preserving fragments of the past, like flies in amber. 

Wim Wenders
[Artist and filmmaker, b. 1945, Düsseldorf, lives in Berlin.]

 The beautiful image today means nothing. It’s worth shit. In fact, it’s almost as if it has the opposite effect, because you’re just like everything else out there. 

Francis Wey
[Writer, member de la Société héliographique, b. 1812, Switzerland, d. 1882, Paris.]

 [Photography] is the seed of a revolution against the system of stencillers, to the benefit of reality... it would seem already that the public, more desirous of the truth, is growing less demanding in terms of preconceived ideas of style and beauty, and displaying curiosity toward the cult of the real. (1851)