David Foster Wallace
[Writer, b. 1962, Ithica, New York, d. 2008, Claremont, California.]

 You suffer with the stunted desire caused by one of its oldest lies. Do not believe the photographs. Fame is not the exit from any cage. 

Alex Webb
[Photographer, b. 1952, San Francisco, lives in Brooklyn, New York.]

 ... the possibility of one particular photographer’s pictures lying around the corner is never realized until the photographer is there. It’s one of the enigmas of photography. 

James Welling
[Photographer, b. 1951, Hartford, Connecticut, lives in Los Angeles.]

 There is a narrative behind every image. I often imagine being able to see the photographer standing behind the camera, or perhaps crouching or running with it. 

Edward Weston
[Photographer, b. 1886, Highland Park, Illinois, d. 1958, Wildcat Hill, California.]

 To compose a subject well means no more than to see and present it in the strongest manner possible. 

Jeff Wall
[Photographer, b. 1946, Vancouver, Canada, lives in Vancouver.]

 One paradox I have found is that, the more you use computers in picture-making, the more “hand-made” the picture becomes. Oddly, then, digital technology is leading, in my work at least, toward a greater reliance on handmaking because the assembly and montage of the various parts of the picture is done very carefully by hand. 

Gillian Wearing
[Artist, b. 1963, Birmingham, England, lives in London.]

 I taught myself to use a camera—it’s not very difficult to use a camera, but I never bothered looking at any textbooks on how to make a picture. I had a much more casual relation to it. For me at the time it was much more about the process rather than the results. 

E.B. White
[Writer, b. 1899, Mount Vernon, New York, d. 1985, North Brooklin, Maine.]

 Of course, it may be that the arts of writing and photography are antithetical. The hope and aim of a word-handler is that he may communicate a thought or an impression to his reader without the reader’s realizing that he has been dragged through a series of hazardous or grotesque syntactical situations. In photography the goal seems to be to prove beyond a doubt that the cameraman, in his great moment of creation, was either hanging by his heels from the rafters or was wedged under the floor with his lens in a knothole. 

Art Wolfe
[Photographer, b. 1951, Seattle, Washington, lives in Seattle.]

 For me making a digital photo is like making a watercolor... It’s not a painting, and it’s not a photo. It’s something altogether new.