Michael Heizer
[Artist, b. 1944, Berkeley, California, lives in Hiko, Nevada.]

 I have looked at so many photographs, I can not see them anymore. 

Edward Hopper
[Artist, b. 1882, Nyack, New York, d. 1967, New York.]

 I once got a little camera to use for details of architecture and so forth but the photo was always so different from the perspective the eye gives, I gave it up. 

Dave Hickey
[Writer and critic, b. 1939, rural Texas, lives in Los Angeles.]

 As a step-child of the Factory, I am certain of one thing: images can change the world. I have seen it happen—experienced the “Before and After,” as Andy might say—so I know that images can alter the visual construction of reality we all inhabit, can revise the expectations that we bring to it and priorities that we impose on it—and know, further, that these alterations can entail profound social and political ramifications. 

Chester Higgins
[Photographer, b. 1946, Lexington, Kentucky, lives in Brooklyn, New York.]

 I learned that the camera never lies about the photographer. 

Hans Haacke
[Artist, b. 1936, Cologne, Germany, lives in New York.]

 Whenever the medium of photography is useful for a particular task, I use it. If another medium is more suitable I use that. 

Oliver Wendell Holmes
[Physician, author, father of Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, b. 1809, Cambridge, Massachusetts, d. 1894, Boston, Massachusetts.]

 The very things which an artist would leave out, or render imperfectly, the photograph takes infinite care with, and so makes its illusions perfect. (1859) 

Cornelius Jabez Hughes
[Photographer, b. 1819, London, d. 1894, London.]

 The advance of photography is something like the progress of an army. The main body keeps in safe marching order, while the more daring and adventurous are the pioneers who lead the army—rushing here, feeling their way there; always skirmishing, often retiring, but eventually succeeding in finding new tracks and safe paths for the main body to securely pass along. (1863) 

Philippe Halsman
[Photographer, b. 1906, Riga, Latvia, d. 1979, New York.]

 No photographer should be blamed when, instead of capturing reality, he tries to show things he has seen only in his imagination. Photography is the youngest art form. All attempts to enlarge its frontiers are important and should be encouraged.