Chester Higgins
[Photographer, b. 1946, Lexington, Kentucky, lives in Brooklyn, New York.]

 I had a choice: I could wail against the racism of the [prevailing] pictures or I could go and create photographs that would tell a contrary story. 

Michael Heizer
[Artist, b. 1944, Berkeley, California, lives in Hiko, Nevada.]

 I have looked at so many photographs, I can not see them anymore. 

Sabrina Harman
[U.S. military guard at Abu Ghraib Prison, Iraq, b. 1978, Lorton, Virginia, lives in Virginia.]

 On June 23 I saw my first dead body I took pictures! The other day I heard my first grenade go off. Fun! (To her father, June 23, 2003, written from Abu Ghraib Prison, Iraq) 

Earl "Fatha" Hines
[Jazz musician, b. 1903, Duquesne, Pennsylvania, d. 1983, Oakland, California.]

 I don’t think I think when I play. I have a photographic memory for chords, and when I’m playing, the right chords appear in my mind like photographs long before I get to them. 

Oliver Wendell Holmes
[Physician, author, father of Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, b. 1809, Cambridge, Massachusetts, d. 1894, Boston, Massachusetts.]

 The very things which an artist would leave out, or render imperfectly, the photograph takes infinite care with, and so makes its illusions perfect. (1859) 

Nathaniel Hawthorne
[Writer, b. 1804, Salem, Massachusetts, d. 1864, Plymouth, New Hampshire.]

 [I wish] there was something in the intellectual world analogous to the Daguerreotype... in the visible—something which should print off our deepest, subtlest, and delicatest thoughts and feelings, as minutely and accurately as the above-mentioned instrument paints the various aspects of Nature. (1839) 

Hermann Hesse
[Writer, b. 1877, Calw, Germany, d. 1962, Montagnola, Switzerland.]

 When artists create pictures and thinkers search for laws and formulate thoughts, it is in order to salvage something from the great dance of death, to make something last longer than we do. 

Ernest Hemingway
[Writer, b. 1899, Oak Park, Illinois, d. 1961, Ketchum, Idaho.]

 [Robert] Capa: He was a good friend and a great and very brave photographer. It is bad luck for everybody that the percentages caught up with him. It is especially bad for Capa. (On Capa’s death in Vietnam, May, 27, 1954)