Louise Lawler
[Artist, b. 1947, Bronxville, New York, lives in New York.]

 A photograph is one kind of information. It can be made more or less explicit with a text. You are told “some things” about “something”; never everything. By being “told” you hopefully are more aware that someone is “telling”; choices have been made and can continue to be made. 

Michael Light
[Photographer, b. 1963, Florida, lives in San Francisco.]

 ... anybody who has spent time with cameras and photographs knows that images, like gravestone rubbings, are no more than impressions of the truth. 

Vera Lutter
[Photographer, b. 1960, Kaiserslautern, Germany, lives in New York.]

 My way of working is very hands-off. I install the apparatus of observation, the camera, and then endure the process of observation and record whatever happens. The work is essentially about the passage of time, not about ideas of representation. 

Federico Garcia Lorca
[Poet and playright, b. 1898, Fuente Vaqueros, Granada, Spain, d. 1936, near Barranco de Viznar, Granada.]

 What shall I do now? Align all the landscapes? Muster the lovers who turn into photographs... ? 

Nathan Lyons
[Photographer, writer, and curator, b. 1930, Jamaica, New York, d. 2016, Rochester, New York.]

 Photography has achieved an unprecedented mirroring of the things in our culture. We have pictured so many aspects and objects of our environment in the form of photographs (motion pictures and television) that the composite of these representations has assumed the proportions and identity of an actual environment. 

Michael Lesy
[Writer and artist, b. 1945, Shaker Heights, Ohio, lives in Amherst, Massachusetts.]

 By itself, an ordinary snapshot is no less banal than the petite madeleine in Proust’s In Search of Lost Time… but as goad to memory, it is often the first integer in a sequence of recollections that has the power to deny time for the sake of love. 

Abraham Lincoln
[Lawyer, politician, and leader, b. 1809, Hodgenville, Kentucky, d. 1865, Washington, D.C..]

 There are no bad pictures; that’s just how your face looks sometimes. 

Walter Lippmann
[Writer and journalist, b. 1889, New York, d. 1974, New York.]

 Photographs have the kind of authority over imagination today, which the printed word had yesterday, and the spoken word before that. They seem utterly real. (1922)