Susie Linfield
[Writer and critic, New York, lives in New York.]

 The ability of photographs to conjure deep emotion is one of their great strengths. But this power—precisely because it is divorced from narrative, political context, and analysis—is equally a danger. Ironically, the more searing an image… the more misleading it can be. 

Louise Lawler
[Artist, b. 1947, Bronxville, New York, lives in New York.]

 You know, I’m not even comfortable taking photographs when I know what I’m taking. I feel as if approaching something with too much clarity in advance could eliminate possibilities. 

Brigitte Lacombe
[Photographer, b. 1950, Paris, France, lives in New York.]

 I take pictures all the time. It’s alarming, really. I mean, I wish I could stop! I take snaps of everything, like taking notes. It became a way to look at the world. 

Sol LeWitt
[Artist and theorist, b. 1928, Hartford, Connecticut, d. 2007, New York.]

 What the work of art looks like isn’t too important. 

Bernard-Henri Lévy
[Writer and critic, b. 1948, Béni Saf, Algeria, lives in St-Paul-de-Vence, France.]

 No one wants to see; no one wants to hear. We have to force them to see it, then. There has to be a terrorism of the gaze. 

Edwin Land
[Inventor and entrepreneur, b. 1909, Bridgeport, Connecticut, d. 1991, Cambridge, Massachusetts.]

 Don’t undertake a project unless it is manifestly important and nearly impossible. 

Abraham Lincoln
[Lawyer, politician, and leader, b. 1809, Hodgenville, Kentucky, d. 1865, Washington, D.C..]

 There are no bad pictures; that’s just how your face looks sometimes. 

Michael Lesy
[Writer and artist, b. 1945, Shaker Heights, Ohio, lives in Amherst, Massachusetts.]

 My idea of a good job would be to be paid really well to sit on my ass all day to look at pictures.