Abraham Lincoln
[Lawyer, politician, and leader, b. 1809, Hodgenville, Kentucky, d. 1865, Washington, D.C..]

 There are no bad pictures; that’s just how your face looks sometimes. 

John Loengard
[Photographer, editor, and critic, b. 1934, New York, lives in New York.]

 There really is no moment. The picture is the moment. 

Glenn Ligon
[Artist, b. 1960, Bronx, New York, lives in New York.]

 The impulse to reuse, recycle, and recontextualize is nothing new. What is new is the overabundance of images we have to choose from. The task is to see whether something can be made from them. I do not wish to add any more. (2012) 

Clarence John Laughlin
[Photographer, b. 1905, Lake Charles, Louisiana, d. 1985, New Orleans, Louisiana.]

 The mystery of light [and] the enigma of time form the twin pivots around which all my work revolves. In addition... my work attempts to create a mythology for our contemporary world. 

Vera Lutter
[Photographer, b. 1960, Kaiserslautern, Germany, lives in New York.]

 The first time I created a camera obscura, after I had realized how long I had to sit in there to adjust my eyes to the darkness, to see the projection, which is about 20 or 30 minutes—I thought I’d seen God. 

Jean-François Lyotard
[Writer and philosopher, b. 1924, Versaille, France, d. 1998, Paris.]

 One knows that frontal and/or profile photography is torn to pieces... Inversely, what remains of the photograph must be seen as a fragment coming to fill a gap in the drawing. 

Yve Lomax
[Artist and theorist, b. 1952, Dorset, lives in London.]

 Just when it is thought that we have progressed to the zenith of our modern world, a sudden wind picks up at midday: the sound of the signifier becomes a howl, an endless reverberation; we fear that the world has become hollow. We fear there is no central core. There is no presence immediate unto itself, no thing-in-itself. Nothing comes before, everything comes after. We are living in a ‘post’ world. A world without a fixed reference point. A world without origin. 

Henry Luce
[Publisher, b. 1898, Dengzhou, China, d. 1967, Phoenix, Arizona.]

 To see life. To see the world. To watch the faces of the poor, and the gestures of the proud. To see strange things. Machines, armies, multitudes, and shadows in the jungle. To see, and to take pleasure in seeing. To see and be instructed. To see and be amazed. (Describing the powers of photography; written for the launch of LIFE Magazine, 1936.)