Sherrie Levine
[Artist, b. 1947, Hazleton, Pennsylvania, lives in New York.]

 A picture is a tissue of quotations drawn from the innumerable centers of culture. 

Nathan Lyons
[Photographer, writer, and curator, b. 1930, Jamaica, New York, d. 2016, Rochester, New York.]

 Photography has achieved an unprecedented mirroring of the things in our culture. We have pictured so many aspects and objects of our environment in the form of photographs (motion pictures and television) that the composite of these representations has assumed the proportions and identity of an actual environment. 

Michael Light
[Photographer, b. 1963, Florida, lives in San Francisco.]

 ... anybody who has spent time with cameras and photographs knows that images, like gravestone rubbings, are no more than impressions of the truth. 

Jacques-Henri Lartigue
[Photographer, b. 1894, Courbevoie, France, d. 1986, Nice, France.]

 To talk about photos rather than making them seems idiotic to me. It’s as though I went on and on about a woman I adored instead of making love to her. 

Michael Lesy
[Writer and artist, b. 1945, Shaker Heights, Ohio, lives in Amherst, Massachusetts.]

 My idea of a good job would be to be paid really well to sit on my ass all day to look at pictures. 

Henry Luce
[Publisher, b. 1898, Dengzhou, China, d. 1967, Phoenix, Arizona.]

 To see life. To see the world. To watch the faces of the poor, and the gestures of the proud. To see strange things. Machines, armies, multitudes, and shadows in the jungle. To see, and to take pleasure in seeing. To see and be instructed. To see and be amazed. (Describing the powers of photography; written for the launch of LIFE Magazine, 1936.) 

Zoe Leonard
[Artist and photographer, b. 1961, Liberty, New York, lives in New York.]

 When people look at a photograph, they believe it… My photographs crawl along that edge. I document the world, but from my own biased point of view. 

Jerome Liebling
[Photographer, b. 1924, New York, d. 2011, Northampton, Massachusetts.]

 These days it seems that physical “truth” can easily be rearranged, rethought, or re-created outright. Any image can be made pristine, all the warts can be removed. But returning to the source of a thing—the real source—means the photographer has to watch, dig, listen for voices, sniff the smells, and have many doubts. My life in photography has been lived as a skeptic.