Danny Lyon
[Photographer, b. 1942, New York, lives in Ulster County, New York.]

 I feel totally responsible for what I see. I feel totally responsible for what I photograph. 

Philip Larkin
[Poet and writer, b. 1922, Coventry, England, d. 1985, London.]

 It was your severed image that grew sweeter,
That floated, wing-stiff, focused in the sun
Along uncertainty and gales of shame
Blown out before I slept. Now you are one
I dare not think alive: only a name
That chimes occasionally, as a belief
Long since embedded in the static past. 

Gustave Le Gray
[Photographer, b. 1820, Villiers-le-Bel, France, d. 1884, Cairo, Egypt.]

 It is my deepest wish that photography, instead of falling in the domain of industry, of commerce, will be included among the arts. That is its sole, true place, and that is the direction that I shall always endeavor to guide it. (1852) 

George Platt Lynes
[Photographer, b. 1907, East Orange New Jersey, d. 1955, New York.]

 I’m the damned soul of my (damned) camera, and God, how it hates me sometimes. 

Michael Lesy
[Writer and artist, b. 1945, Shaker Heights, Ohio, lives in Amherst, Massachusetts.]

 The pictures you’re about to see are of people who were actually once alive. 

Jerome Liebling
[Photographer, b. 1924, New York, d. 2011, Northampton, Massachusetts.]

 These days it seems that physical “truth” can easily be rearranged, rethought, or re-created outright. Any image can be made pristine, all the warts can be removed. But returning to the source of a thing—the real source—means the photographer has to watch, dig, listen for voices, sniff the smells, and have many doubts. My life in photography has been lived as a skeptic. 

Dorothea Lange
[Photographer, b. 1895, Hoboken, New Jersey, d. 1965, San Francisco.]

 Pick a theme and work it to exhaustion... the subject must be something you truly love or truly hate. 

Jacques Lacan
[Writer and psychoanalyst, b. 1901, Paris, France, d. 1981, Paris.]

 The evil eye is the fascinum, it is that which has the effect of arresting movement and, literally, of killing life. At the moment the subject stops, suspending his gesture, he is mortified. This anti-life, anti-movement function of the terminal point is the fascinum, and it is precisely one of the dimensions in which the power of the gaze is exercised directly.