Claude Lanzmann
[Filmmaker, b. 1925, Paris, lives in Paris.]

 I think that no one human being would have been able to look at [a hypothetical photographic record of the Nazi gassing of Jews]… I would have preferred to destroy it. It is not visible. 

David LaChapelle
[Photographer, b. 1968, Connecticut, lives in New York.]

 People say photos don’t lie. Mine do. I make mine lie. 

Richard Long
[Artist, b. 1945, Bristol, England, lives in Bristol.]

 I am an artist who sometimes chooses to use photographs, although I am not a photographer. 

Susie Linfield
[Writer and critic, New York, lives in New York.]

 The ability of photographs to conjure deep emotion is one of their great strengths. But this power—precisely because it is divorced from narrative, political context, and analysis—is equally a danger. Ironically, the more searing an image… the more misleading it can be. 

Sol LeWitt
[Artist and theorist, b. 1928, Hartford, Connecticut, d. 2007, New York.]

 What the work of art looks like isn’t too important. 

Louise Lawler
[Artist, b. 1947, Bronxville, New York, lives in New York.]

 Why photographs now? 

Jacques Lacan
[Writer and psychoanalyst, b. 1901, Paris, France, d. 1981, Paris.]

 The evil eye is the fascinum, it is that which has the effect of arresting movement and, literally, of killing life. At the moment the subject stops, suspending his gesture, he is mortified. This anti-life, anti-movement function of the terminal point is the fascinum, and it is precisely one of the dimensions in which the power of the gaze is exercised directly. 

Loretta Lux
[Photographer, b. 1969, Dresden, Germany, lives in Dublin, Ireland.]

 [My subjects] look lost because that is how I see life. I think we are all a bit lost, lost in a world we can’t understand.