Dorothea Lange
[Photographer, b. 1895, Hoboken, New Jersey, d. 1965, San Francisco.]

 I saw and approached the hungry and desperate mother, as if drawn by a magnet. I do not remember how I explained my presence or my camera to her but I do remember she asked me no questions. I made five exposures, working closer and closer from the same direction. I did not ask her name or her history... 

Bernard-Henri Lévy
[Writer and critic, b. 1948, Béni Saf, Algeria, lives in St-Paul-de-Vence, France.]

 No one wants to see; no one wants to hear. We have to force them to see it, then. There has to be a terrorism of the gaze. 

Sol LeWitt
[Artist and theorist, b. 1928, Hartford, Connecticut, d. 2007, New York.]

 What the work of art looks like isn’t too important. 

Nikki S. Lee
[Photographer, b. 1970, Kye-Chang, Korea, lives in New York.]

 People think a big camera and big lighting will make art, and I want to break that rule. If you have a great concept, it can be art. 

O. Winston Link
[Photographer, b. 1914, Brooklyn, New York, d. 2001, South Salem, New York.]

 I was one man and I tackled a big railroad. I did the best I could. 

Philip Larkin
[Poet and writer, b. 1922, Coventry, England, d. 1985, London.]

 But o, photography! as no art is,
Faithful and disappointing! that records
Dull days as dull, and hold-it smiles as frauds,
And will not censor blemishes. 

Jean-François Lyotard
[Writer and philosopher, b. 1924, Versaille, France, d. 1998, Paris.]

 One knows that frontal and/or profile photography is torn to pieces... Inversely, what remains of the photograph must be seen as a fragment coming to fill a gap in the drawing. 

Claude Lévi-Strauss
[Anthropologist, b. 1908, Brussels, Belgium, d. 2009, Paris.]

 [Photography] remains servile to a “thoughtless” vision of the world… As the term snapshot suggests, photography seizes the moment and exhibits it.