Francis Bacon
[Philosopher, scientist, b. 1561, London, d. 1626, Highgate, England.]

 The contemplation on things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitute or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention. (Taken by photographer Dorothea Lange as her credo) 

Samuel Butler
[Writer, b. 1835, Langar Rectory, Nottinghamshire, England, d. 1902, London.]

 All our education is very much a case of retouching negatives till all the character and individuality is gone. 

David Burnett
[Photojournalist, b. 1946, Salt Lake City, Utah, lives in Arlington, Virginia.]

 War isn’t a TV show with plot twists to keep the viewers interested. The proliferation of images and blanket media coverage have suffocated the life out of old-style photojournalism. 

Honoré de Balzac
[Writer, b. 1799, Tours, France, d. 1850, Paris.]

 The steam-engine was rejected as absurd, just as aerial navigation is today. So were gunpowder, the printing press, spectacles and the latest newcomer, the daguerreotype. If someone had gone up to Napoleon and told him that a building or a man is permanently represented by an image in the atmosphere, and that everything that exists possesses an intangible spectre which may nevertheless become visible, Napoleon would have had him put away in the asylum at Charenton, just as Richelieu dispatched the unfortunate Salomon de Cuax to the madhouse at Bicêtre when that Norman martyr came to him with the invention of the steamship. —And yet Daguerre’s invention demonstrates exactly what I have just said. 

Gus Blaisdell
[Writer, b. 1935, San Diego, d. 2003, Albuquerque, New Mexico.]

 Photography is inherently occult, a medium contacting the dead without contagion. 

Charles Babbage
[Mathematician, analytical philosopher, proto-computer scientist, b. 1791, London, England, d. 1871, London.]

 An object is frequently not seen, from not knowing how to see it, rather than from any defect of the organ of vision. 

Brassaï (Gyula Halász)
[Photographer, b. 1889, Brassó, Transylvania, Hungary (now Romania), d. 1984, Eze, Alpes-Maritimes, France.]

 ... we photographers are nothing but a pack of crooks, thieves and voyeurs. We are to be found everywhere we are not wanted; we betray secrets that were never entrusted to us; we spy shamelessly on things that are not our business; And end up the hoarders of a vast quantity of stolen goods. 

Dmitri Baltermants
[Photographer, b. 1912, Warsaw, Poland, d. 1990, Moscow.]

 We photographers make magnificent shots of wars, fires, earthquakes, and murder: the grief of humanity. We would like to see photographs about joy, happiness and love, but on the same level of quality. I realize, though, that this is difficult.