William Eggleston
[Photographer, b. 1939, Memphis, Tennessee, lives in Memphis.]

 I had this notion of what I called a democratic way of looking around, that nothing was more or less important. 

Ralph Waldo Emerson
[Writer and thinker, b. 1803, Boston, Massachusetts, d. 1882, Concord, Massachusetts.]

 No man quarrels with his shadow, nor will he when the sun was the painter. Here is no interference, and the distortions are not the blunders of an artist. 

Frederick Engels, Karl Marx
[Political philosopher, b. 1818, Barmen, Germany, d. 1895, London.]
[Political philosophers, b. 1818, Trier, Germany, d. 1883, London.]

 If in all ideology men and their circumstances appear upside-down as in a camera obscura, this phenomenon arises just as much from their historical life-process as the inversion of objects on the retina does from the physical life-process. 

George Eastman
[Inventor and industrialist, b. 1854, Waterville, New York, d. 1932, Rochester, New York.]

 Light makes photography. Embrace light. Admire it. Love it. But above all, know light. 

Umberto Eco
[Writer, semiotician, and philosopher, b. 1932, Alessandria, Piedmont, Italy, d. 2016, Milan.]

 The photograph [of Che Guevara], for a civilization now accustomed to thinking in images, was not the description of a single event... it was an argument. 

Peter Henry Emerson
[Writer and photographer, b. 1856, LaPalma, Cuba, d. 1936, Falmouth, Cornwall, England.]

 “A photograph,” it has been said, “shows the art of nature rather that the art of the artist.” This is mere nonsense, as the same remark might by applied equally to all the fine arts. Nature does not jump into the camera, focus itself, expose itself, develop itself, and print itself. (1889) 

Brian Eno
[Musician, composer, artist, b. 1948, Woodbridge, England, lives in Suffolk, England.]

 Whatever you now find weird, ugly, uncomfortable and nasty about a new medium will surely become its signature... The excitement of grainy film, of bleached-out black and white, is the excitement of witnessing events too momentous for the medium assigned to record them. 

Paul Éluard
[Writer, b. 1895, Sant-Denis, France, d. 1952, Charenton-le-Pont, France.]

 Seeing is understanding, judging, transforming, imagining, forgetting and being forgotten, being or disappearing.