Harold Edgerton
[Scientist, inventor, and photographer, b. 1903, Fremont, Nebraska, d. 1990, Cambridge, Massachusetts.]

 If you don’t wake up at three in the morning and want to do something, you’re wasting your time. 

Lady Elizabeth Eastlake (Elizabeth Rigby)
[Writer and photographer, b. 1809, London, d. 1893, London.]

 Every individual who launches his happiness on this stream [of photography] finds currents and rocks not laid down in the chart. Every sanguine little couple who set up a glass-house at the commencement of summer, call their friends about them, and toil alternately in broiling light and stifling gloom, have said before long, in their hearts, “Photography, thy name is disappointment!” (1857) 

Ralph Waldo Emerson
[Writer and thinker, b. 1803, Boston, Massachusetts, d. 1882, Concord, Massachusetts.]

 No man quarrels with his shadow, nor will he when the sun was the painter. Here is no interference, and the distortions are not the blunders of an artist. 

Olafur Eliasson
[Artist, b. 1967, Copenhagen, Denmark, lives in Berlin, Germany.]

 Photographs have a relevance for things that cannot be said. 

Paul Éluard
[Writer, b. 1895, Sant-Denis, France, d. 1952, Charenton-le-Pont, France.]

 Seeing is understanding, judging, transforming, imagining, forgetting and being forgotten, being or disappearing. 

Walker Evans
[Photographer, b. 1903, St. Louis, Missouri, d. 1975, New Haven, Connecticut.]

 [Photography] is not cute cats, nor nudes, motherhood, or arrangements of manufactured products. Under no circumstances is it anything ever anywhere near a beach. 

Mary Beth Edelson
[Artist and feminist activist, b. 1935, East Chicago, Indiana, lives in New York.]

 What I am most concerned with is spirituality as it manifests itself in our bodies/minds and how this affects how we see/feel about our being, and as a feminist awakening to the greater self as female, as well as making a political statement for women that says I am, and I am large, and I am my body, and I am not going away. 

Elliott Erwitt
[Photographer, b. 1928, Paris, France, lives in New York.]

 After following the crowd for a while, I’d then go 180 degrees in the exact opposite direction. It always worked for me, but then again, I’m very lucky.