Wendy Ewald
[Photographer and educator, b. 1951, Detroit, Michigan, lives in Rhinebeck, New York.]

 Gradually I saw that it was less interesting for me, as an artist, to frame the world wholly according to my own perceptions. I wanted instead to create situations in which I allowed others’ perceptions to surface with my own. 

Nora Ephron
[Writer, b. 1941, New York, d. 2012, New York.]

 I recognize that printing pictures of corpses raises all sorts of problems about taste and titillation and sensationalism; the fact is, however, that people die. Death happens to be one of life’s main events. And it is irresponsible and more than that, inaccurate, for newspapers to fail to show it. 

Albert Einstein
[Scientist, b. 1879, Ulm, Württemberg, Germany, d. 1955, Princeton, New Jersey.]

 I dislike every photograph taken of me. However, this one I dislike a little bit less. (On the portrait by Philippe Halsman, who he excluded from his normal characterization of photographers as Lichtaffen—“Light monkeys.”) 

Bill Eppridge
[Photographer, b. 1938, Buenos Aires, d. 2013, Danbury, Connecticut.]

 There in front of me was the Senator on the floor being held by the busboy. There was nobody else around, and I made my first frame, and I forgot to focus the camera. The second frame was a little more in focus… then just for a second, while everything was open, the busboy looked up, and he had this look in his eye. I made that picture, and then suddenly the whole situation closed in again. And it became bedlam.(On the 1968 shooting of U.S. presidential candidate Bobby Kennedy.) 

Mary Beth Edelson
[Artist and feminist activist, b. 1935, East Chicago, Indiana, lives in New York.]

 What I am most concerned with is spirituality as it manifests itself in our bodies/minds and how this affects how we see/feel about our being, and as a feminist awakening to the greater self as female, as well as making a political statement for women that says I am, and I am large, and I am my body, and I am not going away. 

Frederick H. Evans
[Photographer and bookseller, b. 1853, London, d. 1943, London.]

 Photography is photography; and in its purity and innocence is far too valuable and beautiful to be spoilt by making it imitate something else. (1908) 

Ralph Waldo Emerson
[Writer and thinker, b. 1803, Boston, Massachusetts, d. 1882, Concord, Massachusetts.]

 No man quarrels with his shadow, nor will he when the sun was the painter. Here is no interference, and the distortions are not the blunders of an artist. 

Barbara Ess
[Photographer, b. 1948, Brooklyn, New York, lives in New York.]

 I try to photograph what can’t be photographed—psychological or subjective reality, which seems more real than physical or consensual reality.