James Joyce
[Writer, b. 1882, Rathgar, Ireland, d. 1941, Zurich, Switzerland.]

 He dwelt, being a bit of an artist in his spare time, on the female form in general developmentally because, as it so happened, no later than that afternoon he had seen those Grecian statues, 1450 perfectly developed as works of art, in the National Museum. Marble could give the original, shoulders, back, all the symmetry, all the rest... Whereas no photo could because it simply wasn’t art in a word. 

Henry James
[Writer, b. 1843, New York, d. 1916, Rye, England.]

 Any point of view is interesting that is a direct impression of life. You each have an impression colored by your individual conditions; make that into a picture, a picture framed by your own personal wisdom, your glimpse of the American world. 

Fredric Jameson
[Writer and theoretician, b. 1934, Cleveland, Ohio, lives in Durham, North Carolina.]

 The visual is essentially pornographic, which is to say that it has its end in rapt, mindless fascination. 

William Henry Jackson
[Photographer, b. 1843, Keesville, New York, d. 1942, New York.]

 Portrait photography never had any charms for me, so I sought my subjects from the house-tops, and finally from the hill-tops and about the surrounding country; the taste strengthening as my successes became greater in proportion to the failures. 

Carl Jung
[Psychoanalyst and writer, b. 1875, Kessewil, Switzerland, d. 1961, Zurich.]

 Your vision will become clear only when you look into your heart. Who looks outside, dreams. Who looks inside, awakens. 

Jasper Johns
[Artist, b. 1930, Augusta, Georgia, lives in Sharon, Connecticut and the island of St. Martin.]

 A picture ought to be looked at the same way you look at a radiator. 

Bill Jay
[Photographer, writer, and curator, b. 1940, Maidenhead, England, d. 2009, Samara, Costa Rica.]

 Making a photograph is as difficult as finding a particularly frisky cat in a dark room. Making a great photograph is as chancy as trying to catch a frisky cat in a black room in which there is no cat. 

William James
[Writer, philosopher, and psychologist, b. 1842, New York, d. 1910, Chocoura, New Hampshire.]

 Whilst part of what we perceive comes through our senses from the object before us, another part (and it may be the larger part) always comes out of our own mind.