Lars Tunbjörk
[Photographer, b. 1956, Borås, Sweden, d. 2015, Stockholm.]

 I try to take photos like an alien, or a small child. 

William Henry Fox Talbot
[Mathematician and pioneer of photography, b. 1800, Melbury, Dorset, England, d. 1877, Lacock Abbey, England.]

 How charming it would be if it were possible to cause these natural images to imprint themselves durable and remain fixed upon the paper! And why should it not be possible? I asked myself. 

Larry Towell
[Photographer, b. 1953, Chatham-Kent, Ontario, Canada, lives in Lambton County, Ontario, Canada.]

 … photojournalism has its tremendous rewards and it’s wonderful work. In what other work can you wander aimlessly with a camera around your neck, armed only with your personal interest and your eyes? 

Peter Turnley
[Photographer, b. 1955, Fort Wayne, Indiana, lives in New York and Paris.]

 Photographers do themselves a disservice by talking too much about the equipment they use. Consequently people don’t take them seriously as creators in their own right. When people talk to writers about their work, they ask about their ideas and inspirations. When they talk to photographers, they ask about what cameras or film they use. That’s wrong—as wrong as asking a writer what pencil and laptop he uses. 

Shomei Tomatsu
[Photographer, b. 1930, Nagoya, Japan, d. 2012, Okinawa, Japan.]

 If I could, I would want to see everything: the affairs of others, the scene of a murder, the Pygmies in the African rain forest, the super-rich of Wall Street, the face of the man who stole three hundred million yen, the Sydney Opera House, the graveyard of ships in the Sargasso Sea, the tail of an orca, the plankton of the deep ocean, the inside of Prime Minister Sato’s belly, Mao Zedong, Mars, Cape Kennedy, Antarctic blizzards, the animal whose name is “sloth,” the pudendum of Marilyn Monroe. My eyes are infamously greedy:... to me, the stuff other photographers substitute for seeing is but a kind of pessimism. 

Edmund Teske
[Photographer, b. 1911, Chicago, Illinois, d. 1996, Los Angeles.]

 Just as we have taken in words, we have taken in images... they are afloat within us... as they come out in different combinations, images made in different points in time also become, in a sense, timeless. 

George Trow
[Writer and critic, b. 1943, New York, d. 2006, Naples, Italy.]

 There was a time when photographers were thought to be socially secondary, and, hence, not dangerous. Lincoln was more important than Brady. It didn’t occur to anyone to worry about the manner in which a photograph was taken. 

Spencer Tunick
[Artist, b. 1967, Middletow., New York, lives in New York.]

 There are some people over there with clothes, get them out of there!