Sigmar Polke
[Painter and photographer, b. 1941, Oels, Silesia, Germany (Now Poland), d. 2010, Cologne, Germany.]

 It’s the procedures in and for themselves that interest me. The picture isn’t really necessary. 

Secondo Pia
[Lawyer and amateur photographer, b. 1855, Asti, Italy, d. 1941, Milan.]

 Shut up in my darkroom all intent on my work, I experienced a very strong emotion when, during the development, I saw for the first time the Holy Face appear on the plate, with such clarity that I was dumbfounded by it. (On his 1898 photograph which highlighted the alleged face in what is known as “the Shroud of Turin.”) 

Ezra Pound
[Poet, b. 1885, Hailey, Idaho, d. 1972, Venice, Italy.]

 Almost any fool can paint an academy picture, and any imbecile can shoot off a Kodak. 

Pablo Picasso
[Artist, b. 1881, Málaga, Spain, d. 1973, Mougin, France.]

 When you see what you express through photography, you realize all the things that can no longer be the objective of painting. Why should the artist persist in treating subjects that can be established so clearly with the lens of a camera? 

Jayne Anne Phillips
[Writer, b. 1952, Buckhannon, West Virginia, lives in Boston, Massachusetts.]

 We take language into our minds; we read words in the same internal voice with which we think, remember, pray. But when we look at paintings or photographs, the reverse is true. If the image corresponds to our most intensely personal, yet archetypal, yearnings and memories, we don’t take the image in, we move out of ourselves into the image, as though it were another world, a hologram whose forms of light are ghostly angels, or a dream whose physical reality is suggested by what we see on the surface of a canvas or a page. We connect with the image as though we had lost it within our own memories and are now surprised to find it represented outside ourselves, vital and luminous, charged with energy. 

Martin Parr
[Photographer, b. 1952, Epson, Surrey, England, lives in Bristol and London, England.]

 The easy bit is picking up a camera and pointing and shooting. But then you have to decide what it is you’re trying to say and express. 

Norman Parkinson
[Photographer, b. 1913, London, d. 1990, Singapore.]

 I like there to be a joke in practically every photo I take. Nobody has the right to make photography boring. 

Octavio Paz
[Poet and writer, b. 1914, Mexico City, d. 1998, Mexico City.]

 Photos:
time dangling from a verbal thread
Black mountain
white cloud,
Girl selling birds