Norman Parkinson
[Photographer, b. 1913, London, d. 1990, Singapore.]

 I like there to be a joke in practically every photo I take. Nobody has the right to make photography boring. 

Richard Prince
[Artist, b. 1949, Panama Canal Zone, lives in New York.]

 We do not make art. We have unnamable motors and dangerous impulses that occupy our thoughts. 

Martin Parr
[Photographer, b. 1952, Epson, Surrey, England, lives in Bristol and London, England.]

 The easy bit is picking up a camera and pointing and shooting. But then you have to decide what it is you’re trying to say and express. 

Harold Pinter
[Playwright, b. 1930, London, d. 2008, London.]

 I might even show you my photograph album. You might even see a face in it which might remind you of your own, of what you once were. You might see faces of others, in shadow, or cheeks of others turning, or jaws, or backs of necks, or eyes, dark under hats, which might remind you of others, whom you once knew, whom you thought long dead, but from whom you will still receive a sidelong glance. 

Jayne Anne Phillips
[Writer, b. 1952, Buckhannon, West Virginia, lives in Boston, Massachusetts.]

 We take language into our minds; we read words in the same internal voice with which we think, remember, pray. But when we look at paintings or photographs, the reverse is true. If the image corresponds to our most intensely personal, yet archetypal, yearnings and memories, we don’t take the image in, we move out of ourselves into the image, as though it were another world, a hologram whose forms of light are ghostly angels, or a dream whose physical reality is suggested by what we see on the surface of a canvas or a page. We connect with the image as though we had lost it within our own memories and are now surprised to find it represented outside ourselves, vital and luminous, charged with energy. 

Kim Phúc
[Human being, subject of iconic photograph, b. 1963, Trang Bang, South Vietnam, lives in Ajax, Canada.]

 That photograph is more powerful than bombs. (On the photograph of her as a nine-year-old fleeing the village of Trang Bang, Vietnam after it was napalm bombed by the United States in 1972.) 

Tim Page
[Photographer, b. 1944, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, lives in Brisbane, Australia.]

 Every good war picture becomes an anti-war picture. 

Gordon Parks
[Photographer and filmmaker, b. 1912, Fort Scott, Kansas, d. 2006, New York.]

 Think in terms of images and words. They can be mighty powerful when they are fitted together properly.