Jackson Pollock
[Artist, b. 1912, Cody, Wyoming, d. 1956, Springs, New York.]

 The modern artist is living in a mechanical age, and we have a mechanical means of representing objects in nature such as the camera and photograph. The modern artist [therefore], it seems to me is working and expressing an inner world, in other words expressing the energy, the motion, and other inner forces. (1950) 

Harold Pinter
[Playwright, b. 1930, London, d. 2008, London.]

 I might even show you my photograph album. You might even see a face in it which might remind you of your own, of what you once were. You might see faces of others, in shadow, or cheeks of others turning, or jaws, or backs of necks, or eyes, dark under hats, which might remind you of others, whom you once knew, whom you thought long dead, but from whom you will still receive a sidelong glance. 

Jayne Anne Phillips
[Writer, b. 1952, Buckhannon, West Virginia, lives in Boston, Massachusetts.]

 We take language into our minds; we read words in the same internal voice with which we think, remember, pray. But when we look at paintings or photographs, the reverse is true. If the image corresponds to our most intensely personal, yet archetypal, yearnings and memories, we don’t take the image in, we move out of ourselves into the image, as though it were another world, a hologram whose forms of light are ghostly angels, or a dream whose physical reality is suggested by what we see on the surface of a canvas or a page. We connect with the image as though we had lost it within our own memories and are now surprised to find it represented outside ourselves, vital and luminous, charged with energy. 

Martin Parr
[Photographer, b. 1952, Epson, Surrey, England, lives in Bristol and London, England.]

 ... I accept that all photography is voyeuristic and exploitative, and obviously I live with my own guilt and conscience. It’s part of the test and I don’t have a problem with it. 

Norman Parkinson
[Photographer, b. 1913, London, d. 1990, Singapore.]

 The only thing that gets in the way of a really good photograph is the camera. 

Olivia Parker
[Photographer, b. 1941, Boston, Massachusetts, lives in Manchester, Massachusetts.]

 If you don’t love making photographs do something else. 

Sylvia Plachy
[Photographer, b. 1943, Budapest, Hungary, lives in New York.]

 Every photo is almost a fiction or a dream. If it’s really good, it’s another form of life. 

Octavio Paz
[Poet and writer, b. 1914, Mexico City, d. 1998, Mexico City.]

 Photos:
time dangling from a verbal thread
Black mountain
white cloud,
Girl selling birds