Woody Guthrie
[Singer-songwriter, b. 1912, Okemah, Oklahoma, d. 1967, New York.]

 If you walk across my camera I will flash the world your story. 

Tennessee Williams
[Writer, b. 1911, Columbus, Mississippi, d. 1983, New York.]

 Everyone should know nowadays the unimportance of the photographic in art: that truth, life, or reality is an organic thing which the poetic imagination can represent or suggest, in essence, only through transformation, through changing into other forms than those which were merely present in appearance. 

Frank Zappa
[Musician and composer, b. 1940, Baltimore, Maryland, d. 1993, Los Angeles.]

 And if another woman driver
Gets machine-gunned from her seat
They’ll send some joker with a brownie
And you’ll see it all complete. 

Henry David Thoreau
[Writer and practical philosopher, b. 1817, Concord, Massachusetts, d. 1862, Concord.]

 The question is not what you look at, but what you see. 

Ulay (Frank Uwe Laysiepen)
[Performance artist, b. 1943, Solingen, Germany, lives in Amsterdam.]

 I didn’t care about the light conditions or formal aspects. I was never busy with the truth; I was always busy with reality. It is a big difference. 

Martin Heidegger
[Philosopher, b. 1889, Messkirch, Baden, Germany, d. 1976, Messkirch.]

 When we reflect on the modern age, we are questioning the modern world picture... Wherever we have the world picture, an essential decision takes place regarding what is, in its entirety... The fundamental event of the modern age is the conquest of the world as picture. The word ‘picture’ [Bild] now means the structured picture [Gebild] that is the creature of man’s producing which represents and sets before... 

Pope John XIII
[Religious leader, b. 1881, Sotto il Monte, Italy, d. 1963, Rome.]

 God knew seventy-seven years ago that someday I would be Pope. Why couldn’t he have made me a little more photogenic? (To photographer Yousef Karsh) 

Carole Vance
[Anthropologist, lives in New York.]

 Heirs to a Victorian cultural tradition that regarded sexual pleasure with profound suspicion, we greet explicit images of sexuality with anxiety and an undeveloped history of looking. Distinctions that viewers are accustomed to making—between fantasy and behavior, image and reality—become curiously evanescent when it comes to sex. Our unease increases if the sexual acts are unfamiliar or unconventional...