Ruth Orkin
[Photographer, b. 1921, Boston, Massachusetts, d. 1985, New York.]

 To be a photojournalist takes experience, skill, endurance, energy, salesmanship, organization, wheedling, climbing, gatecrashing, etc. – plus an eye and patience. 

Muhammad Ali (Cassius Clay)
[Boxer, b. 1942, Louisville, Kentucky, d. Scottsdale, Arizona.]

 Emmett Till and I were about the same age. A week after he was murdered... I stood on a corner with a gang of boys, looking at pictures of him in the black newspapers and magazines. In one, he was laughing and happy. In the other, his head was swollen and bashed in, his eyes bulging out of their sockets, and his mouth twisted and broken... I couldn’t get Emmett Till out of my mind, until one evening I thought of a way to get back at white people for his death. 

D. A. Pennebaker
[Documentary Filmmaker, b. 1925, Evanston, Illinois, lives in Sag Harbor, New York.]

 You can’t point a camera at someone and find out what’s in their head. But it does the next best thing—it lets you speculate. 

Ambrose Bierce
[Writer and journalist, b. 1842, Horse Cave Creek, Ohio, disappeared 1914, Chihuahua, Mexico.]

 A photograph is a picture painted by the sun without instruction in art. It is a little better than the work of an Apache, but not quite so good as that of a Cheyenne. 

Oscar Wilde
[Writer, b. 1854, Dublin, d. 1900, Paris, France.]

 The camera, you know, will never capture you. Photography, in my experience, has the miraculous power of transferring wine into water. 

Diane Keaton
[Actress and photography collector, b. 1946, Los Angeles, lives in Los Angeles.]

 Permanence can only be found in the immortality offered by the click of a camera. Like it or not, life moves on as fleetingly as the photograph is enduring. 

Louise Lawler
[Artist, b. 1947, Bronxville, New York, lives in New York.]

 A photograph is one kind of information. It can be made more or less explicit with a text. You are told “some things” about “something”; never everything. By being “told” you hopefully are more aware that someone is “telling”; choices have been made and can continue to be made. 

Huỳnh Công “Nick” Ut
[Photographer, b. 1951, rural Mekong Delta, province of Long An, Vietnam, lives in Los Angeles.]

 When we moved closer to the village we saw the first people running. I thought ‘Oh my God’ when I suddenly saw a woman with her left leg badly burned by napalm. Then came a woman carrying a baby, who died, then another woman carrying a small child with its skin coming off. When I took a picture of them I heard a child screaming and saw that young girl who had pulled off all her burning clothes. She yelled to her brother on her left. Just before the napalm was dropped soldiers had yelled to the children to run but there wasn’t enough time. (On his photograph of nine-year-old Kim Phuc fleeing the village of Trang Bang, Vietnam after it was napalm bombed in 1972.)