Annie Sprinkle (Ellen Steinberg)
[Artist, writer, pornographer, educator, b. 1954, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, lives in Santa Cruz, California.]

 I always knew I’d be some kind of artist. I thought I’d be an art teacher. In fact, I am an art teacher. When I went into porn, I thought, Oh I’ll never be an art teacher. But I’m hired now as an artist because I went into porn. But I don’t make regular porn anymore. I make post-porn, post-porn modernism... 

Alec Soth
[Photographer, b. 1969, Minneapolis, Minnesota, lives in Saint Paul, Minnesota.]

 Photography, for me, is a lot like web surfing in real life. 

Laurie Simmons
[Photographer, b. 1949, Long Island, New York, lives in New York.]

 People are much more willing nowadays to believe that pictures lie than [that] they can express any kind of truth. 

Albert Sands Southworth
[Photographer, b. 1811, West Fairlee, Vermont, d. 1894, Charlestown, Massachusetts.]

 Into the practice of no other business or art was there ever such an absurd, blind, and pell-mell rush. From the accustomed labours of agriculture and machine shop, from the factory and counter, from the restaurant, coachbox, and forecastle, representatives have appeared to perform the work for which a life apprenticeship could hardly be sufficient for preparation... 

Louis Stettner
[Photographer, b. 1922, Brooklyn, New York, d. 2016, Saint-Ouen, France.]

 I have never been interested in photographs based solely on aesthetics, divorced from reality. I also doubt very much whether this is possible. 

David Levi Strauss
[Writer and critic, b. 1953, Junction City, Kansas, lives in New York.]

 Photographic images used to be about the trace. Digital images are about the flow. 

Beat Streuli
[Photographer and visual artist, b. 1957, Altdorf, Switzerland, lives in Zurich and Brussels.]

 ...I don’t see myself as a documentary photographer. I am more drawn to the image itself, rather than to the description of a scene. And, anyway, every image only halfway represents reality, whereas the other half is rather, more or less, fulfilling our imagination. 

Sandy Skoglund
[Photographer, b. 1946, Quincy, Massachusetts, lives in Jersey City, New Jersey.]

 The idea of making [conceptual] art was not a good way to approach things... Instead I saw myself as trying to make something that my relatives could understand.