W.G Sebald
[Writer, b. 1944, Bavaria, Germany, d. 2001, East Anglia, England.]

 One has the impression that something is stirring inside [photographs]—it is as if one can hear little cries of despair, gémissements de désespoir... as if the photographs themselves had a memory and were remembering us and how we, the surviving, and those who preceded us, once were. 

Art Sinsabaugh
[Photographer, b. 1924, Irvington, New Jersey, d. 1983, Chicago, Illinois.]

 At some point I became aware of the unbelievable infinite detail on the horizon; this is what drew my attention. So I set about to pursue the distant horizon. 

Saul Steinberg
[Artist, b. 1914, Râmnicu Sarat, Romania, d. 1999, New York.]

 It seems that photography has just been calisthenics, an illusion, an alibi for the real thing. 

Bert Stern
[Photographer, b. 1929, Brooklyn, New York, d. 2013, New York.]

 She was so beautiful at that time. I didn’t say, “Pose nude.” It was more one thing leading to another: You take clothes off and off and off and off and off. (On his June 1962 photo shoot with Marilyn Monroe.) 

Rebecca Solnit
[Writer, b. 1961, San Francisco, lives in San Francisco.]

 ...the questions a photographer raises may be more profound than the answers the medium permits. 

Vittorio Storaro
[Cinematographer, b. 1940, Rome, Italy, lives in Rome.]

 We are all made of flesh, of matter. And at the end, this matter is dissolved in light, and transformed into energy. It’s the Einstein formula. Energy is nothing but matter that is moving at the speed of light, squared. 

Hiroshi Sugimoto
[Photographer, b. 1948, Tokyo, lives in New York.]

 If I already have a vision, my work is almost done. The rest is a technical problem. 

José Saramago
[Writer, b. 1922, Azinhaga, Portugal, d. 2010, Tias, Las Palmas, Spain.]

 old photographs are very deceiving, they give us the illusion that we are alive in them, and it’s not true, the person we are looking at no longer exists, and if that person could see us, he or she would not recognise him—or herself in us, ‘Who’s that looking at me so sadly,’ he or she would say.