Abigail Solomon-Godeau
[Writer and theorist, b. 1947, New York, lives in Santa Barbara, California.]

 ... photography, like all camera-made images such as film and video, effaces the marks of its making (and maker) at the click of a shutter. A photograph appears to be self-generated—as though it had created itself. 

Jo Spence
[Artist, photographer, and writer, b. 1934, London, d. 1992, London.]

 The one bright spot in this depression was the arrival of the pictures I had taken of my hospital experience... I was absolutely staggered at what I’d photographed. I couldn’t believe that I had seen so much and already forgotten it. I had already disavowed what had happened to me. But here were the photographs that my guardian self had taken—so much detail. This points up one of the advantages of photographing one’s traumas—before they become sealed over. 

Taryn Simon
[Photographer, b. 1975, New York, lives in New York.]

 There is no truth in photography. One can’t reproduce an absolute truth. That said, I don’t see [my photographs] as being any less truthful than any other photographs. 

Jeanloup Sieff
[Photographer, b. 1930, Paris, d. 2001, Paris.]

 The impulse that led you to make an image is a thing that you cannot share with anyone, even if you explain it. What remains is a surface that will live its own life, that will belong to everybody. I accept that surface. 

Jock Sturges
[Photographer, b. 1947, New York, lives in San Francisco.]

 My work is, in fact, neutral. In fact, its very neutrality is one of the things that worries me about it sometimes. There’s sometimes not a lot of emotive passion in the work. Because I shoot long shutter speeds, people are necessarily very still, and the work is very, very plain and... neutral. That neutrality isn’t sexual by nature. My subjects are just there. So if you read sexuality into my pictures, beyond what’s inherent to a human being, then the work is acting as a Rorschach, and you’re evincing sexual immaturity or sexual malaise in your own life. I have to tell you, I am sometimes deeply suspicious of the sexual mental health of some of the people who point their wavering fingers at the morality, the art, of others. 

Alec Soth
[Photographer, b. 1969, Minneapolis, Minnesota, lives in Saint Paul, Minnesota.]

 In a world where the 2 billionth photograph has been uploaded to Flickr, which looks like an Eggleston picture! How do you deal with making photographs with the tens of thousands of photographs being uploaded to Facebook every second, how do you manage that? How do you contribute to that? What’s the point? 

Larry Sultan
[Photographer, b. 1946, Brooklyn, New York, d. 2009, Greenbrae, California.]

 I always thought of a great photograph as if some creature walked into my room; it’s like, how did you get here? What are you made of? And no matter how many pictures I make, I have never depleted that quality of mystery. 

Jason Salavon
[Artist, b. 1970, Indianapolis, Indiana, lives in Chicago.]

 It’s dense out there. It’s a world of massively interconnected networks, a world of traffic jams and paper trails. A world teeming with life and movement. A place of information and data. My work and the software I write for it investigates the manipulation, reorganization, and/or generation of immense data sets common to American life.