Peter Galassi
[Curator and writer, b. 1951, Washington, D.C., lives in New York.]

 Alone, the Surrealist wanders the streets without destination but with a premeditated alertness for the unexpected detail that will release a marvelous and compelling reality just beneath the banal surface of ordinary experience. His every act is calculated to disrupt the conventional pattern of life, to invite irrational obsession. 

Sid Grossman
[Photographer, b. 1913, New York, d. 1955, Provincetown, Massachusetts.]

 The function of the photographer is to help people understand the world around them. 

William Gibson
[Writer, b. 1948, Conway, South Carolina, lives in Vancouver, Canada.]

 Case turned his head and looked up into Wage’s face. It was a tanned and forgettable mask. The eyes were vatgrown sea-green Nikon transplants. Wage wore a suit of gunmetal silk and a simple bracelet of platinum on either wrist. (1984) 

Flor Garduño
[Photographer, b. 1957, Mexico City, lives in Stabio, Switzerland.]

 Each picture... is a small legend about beauty, sex, wonder, and women’s intimate lives. 

Helmut Gernsheim
[Photographer, collector, and photohistorian, b. 1913, Munich, Germany, d. 1995, Lugano, Switzerland.]

 Your nightmare existence in a trunk is over... At long last you will be recognized as the inventor of photography. This picture will prove it to all the world. (On his discovery of the “first photograph,” made by Joseph Nicéphore Niépce.) 

Vicki Goldberg
[Critic and writer, St. Louis, Missouri, lives in New York.]

 When photography was invented, people had to make room in their minds for the idea that the dead would always be visible. 

Dennis Grady
[lives in South Pomfret, Vermont.]

 Display of the captive before the camera lens, the condition Crazy Horse so ardently avoided, quickly became a ritual of power. The U.S. Cavalry photographically documented hundreds of captive Indians along their forced marches to penal colony reservations, and such images are commonplace in histories of the West. 

William Garnett
[Photographer, b. 1916, Chicago, d. 2006, Napa, California.]

 To show people the ugly doesn’t accomplish much. I came to the conclusion that I can’t really make much of a change in society’s attitude towards land use by just showing them what’s wrong. I’ve come to the conclusion you have to show them what’s right, and inspire them.