Ron Galella
[Photographer, b. 1931, Bronx, New York, lives in New York.]

 My job is thick with risks, threats, occasional violence and sometimes the necessary folly that sometimes courts humiliation and ridicule. But I don’t care. I see myself as the dean of American paparazzi. 

Emmet Gowin
[Photographer, b. 1941, Danville, Virginia, lives in Princeton, New Jersey.]

 All important pictures embody something that we do not yet understand. 

John Gutmann
[Photographer, b. 1905, Breslau, Germany, (now Wroclaw, Poland), d. 1998, San Francisco, California.]

 To me, photography was a completely new medium, and I did not... feel the urge to transfer to it my ideas about painting. 

Mark Getty
[Oil fortune heir, photo stock entrepreneur, b. 1960, Rome, lives in Buckinghamshire, Tuscany, and London.]

 In some areas, [Getty Images has] more images than the rest of the market put together. But libraries are being built up at a terrific pace. A photographer in a lifetime will produce maybe a million images, and there are about 15,000 professionals at work out there. 

George, Gilbert
[Artist, b. 1942, Devon, England, lives in London.]
[Artist, b. 1943, Dolomites, Italy, lives in London.]

 Being living sculptures is our life blood, our destiny, our romance, our disaster, our light and life. 

David Goldblatt
[Photographer, b. 1930, Randfontein, South Africa, d. 2018, Johannesburg.]

 I regard myself as an unlicensed, self-appointed observer and critic of South African society which I continue to explore with the camera. 

Andy Grundberg
[Critic, curator, and educator, lives in Washington, D.C.]

 ...truth-telling may be an ethic, adopted by photojournalists as a behavior, but experience shows us that it is not embedded in the medium like silver salts in film. 

Jonathan Green
[Writer, photographer, and curator, b. 1939, lives in Riverside, California.]

 It was consistent with the social and psychological upheavals of the sixties that a documentary focus should emerge that looked at the less newsworthy, internal aspects of the new culture... The obsessions of sixties photography were ruthless: alienation, deformity, sterility, insanity, sexuality, bestial and mechanical violence, and obscenity.