Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
[Poet, novelist, playwright, and natural philosopher, b. 1749, Frankfurt am Main, Germany, d. 1832, Weimar, Germany.]

 The hardest thing to see is what is in front of your eyes. (Maxim often quoted by Albert Renger-Patzsch.) 

Paul Gauguin
[Artist, b. 1848, Paris, d. 1903, Hiva Oa, Marquesas Islands.]

 Machines have come, art has fled, and I am far from thinking photography can help us. 

Laura Gilpin
[Photographer, b. 1891, Austin Bluffs, Colorado, d. 1979, Santa Fe, New Mexico.]

 Every great work of art is fundamentally a fine design in its arrangement of light and dark, of line and form. All of us are sensitive to this, some of [us] consciously, some unconsciously. The photographer can arrange his picture just as the painter does, only sometimes he must go about it in a different way. (1928) 

Andy Grundberg
[Critic, curator, and educator, lives in Washington, D.C.]

 Facts cling to photographs like dust. 

Emmet Gowin
[Photographer, b. 1941, Danville, Virginia, lives in Princeton, New Jersey.]

 This is the gift of the landscape photograph, that the heart finds a place to stand. 

Jim Goldberg
[Photographer, b. 1953, New Haven, Connecticut, lives in San Francisco.]

 [A photograph] is a part of the evidence. I’m not saying it’s the truth—it’s part of the evidence. 

Mario Giacomelli
[Photographer, b. 1925, Senigallia, Italy, d. 2000, Senigallia.]

 I don’t know about other people’s cameras. Mine is a thing I had cobbled up, it holds together with tape and is always losing parts. All I need to set is the distance and that other thing—what do you call that other thing? 

Beate Gütschow
[Photographer, b. 1970, Mainz, Germany, lives in Berlin and Hamburg, Germany.]

 In my work, ideal means not to exclude ugliness, it means to construct reality.