Judy Dater
[Photographer, b. 1941, Hollywood, lives in San Francisco.]

 I want to show people as they are, not glorified, no shame—fat, bulges, wrinkles and all. I want the work to be disturbing, unsettling, provocative, challenging, and thought provoking. 

Edmundo Desnoes
[Writer, b. 1930, Havana, Cuba, lives in New York.]

 The richness of our contemporary visual world must be seen as a danger. It is an overwhelming and oppressive world. A world that manifests itself fundamentally through the image is only a few steps from totalitarian manipulation. 

Marcel Duchamp
[Artist, b. 1887, Blainville, France, d. 1968, Neilly-sur-Seine, France.]

 You know exactly what I think of photography. I would like to see it make people despise painting until something else will make photography unbearable. (In a letter to Alfred Stieglitz) 

Max Dupain
[Photographer, b. 1911, Sidney, Australia, d. 1992, Sidney.]

 Photography is a new means of expression in society. In a hundred years it has evolved to a state of being a primary visual force in our lives. (1947) 

Frederick Douglass
[Writer, orator, activist, b. 1818, Talbot County, Maryland, d. 1895, Washington, D.C..]

 Poets, prophets and reformers are all picture makers—and this ability is the secret of their power and of their achievements. 

Corinne Day
[Photographer, b. 1962, Ealing, West London, d. 2010, Denham, England.]

 I always thought [my models] looked best when they were sitting in their pajamas smoking pot and getting pissed on a bottle of wine. So that’s what I documented. I liked the girls looking how they were naturally… 

Don DeLillo
[Writer, b. 1936, New York, lives in New York.]

 All the impulses of the media were fed into the circuitry of my dreams. One thinks of echoes. One thinks of an image made in the image and likeness of images. It was that complex. 

Allan deSouza
[Artist and writer, b. 1958, Nairobi, Kenya, lives in Los Angeles.]

 Photography is now so vital to memory, as a safeguard that the past will not be erased. With the Jewish Holocaust, for example, photographs have become so central to the process of remembering—not necessarily private, but certainly collective, and ironically, we often rely, as with the Khmer Rouge, on the photographs taken by the murderers.