William Claxton
[Photographer, b. 1927, Pasadena, California, d. 2008, Los Angeles.]

 Photography is jazz for the eyes. All I ask you to do is to listen with your eyes. 

Larry Clark
[Photographer and filmmaker, b. 1943, Tulsa, Oklahoma, lives in New York.]

 [Eugene Smith] was always writing these diatribes about truth, and how he wanted to tell the truth, the truth, the truth. It was a real rebel position. It was kind of like a teenager’s position: why can’t things be like they should be? Why can’t I do what I want? I latched on to that philosophy. One day I snapped, hey, you know, I know a story that no one’s ever told, never seen, and I’ve lived it. It’s my own story and my friends’ story. 

Eleanor Callahan (née Knapp)
[Muse and model to husband Harry Callahan, b. 1916, Royal Oak, Michigan, d. 2012, Atlanta, Georgia.]

 He just liked to take the pictures of me. In every pose. Rain or shine. And whatever I was doing. If I was doing the dishes or if I was half asleep. And he knew that I never, never said no. I was always there for him. Because I knew that Harry would only do the right thing. 

Italo Calvino
[Writer, b. 1923, Santiago de la Vegas, Cuba, d. 1985, Siena, Italy.]

 Perhaps true, total photography, he thought, is a pile of fragments of private images, against the creased background of massacres and coronations. 

George Carlin
[Comedian and social critic, b. 1937, New York, d. 2008, Santa Monica, California.]

 I don’t own a camera, so I travel with a police sketch artist. 

James Casebere
[Photographer, b. 1953, Lansing, Michigan, lives in New York.]

 The novels by Latin American magical realists showed how history is rewritten by each successive military dictatorship. I look at photography the same way: as a fiction, as representative of a particular point of view. 

Elinor Carcucci
[Photographer, b. 1971, Jerusalem, lives in New York.]

 People do things for the camera that knock me out, these strong, intense, revelatory things.... It’s like a little stage offered to you... But it doesn’t make it fake, it’s just a different process. 

Anthony Aziz, Sammy Cucher

 The buzz and excitement generated by media technologies are but a logical reaction in a culture steeped in materialism: it creates the illusion that we can reduce every mental act into matter, with no regard to how poor or incomplete that alchemy might be. As the technology progresses and the possibility of manipulating and communicating exclusively with images grows, mental spaces will be eradicated, fixed into flattened expanses of unambiguous surfaces.