Lennart Nilsson
[Photographer and scientist, b. 1922, Strangnas, Sweden, d. 2017, Stockholm.]

 I want to reveal that which is close to us, that which is familiar, in a new way. 

Joseph Nicéphore Niépce
[One of the originators of photography, b. 1765, Chalon-sur-Saône, France, d. 1833, Gras, France.]

 The discovery I have made and which I call Heliography, consists in reproducing spontaneously, by the action of light, with gradations of tints from black to white, the images received in the camera obscura. 

James Nachtwey
[Photographer, b. 1948, Syracuse, New York, lives in New York.]

 The greatest statesmen, philosophers, humanitarians… have not been able to put an end to war. Why place that demand on photography? 

Ogden Nash
[Poet and humorist, b. 1902, Rye, New York, d. 1971, Baltimore, Maryland.]

 Some hate broccoli, some hate bacon
I hate having my picture taken.
How can your family claim to love you
And then demand a picture of you? 

Nancy Newhall
[Writer, curator, and historian, b. 1908, Lynn, Massachusetts, d. 1974, on the Snake River, Idaho.]

 Perhaps the old literacy of words is dying and a new literacy of images is being born. Perhaps the printed page will disappear and even our records will be kept in images and sounds. 

Simon Norfolk
[Photographer, b. 1963, Lagos, Nigeria, lives in Brighton, England.]

 [My] pictures are about memory and forgetfulness. The evidence is dissolving. Bones crumble; human ash returns to soil; teeth, sandals, hair, bullets, axes disperse into atoms and molecules. Footprints in the snow will be erased by the next storm. The evidence of evil, like the evidence of good, obeys the universal laws of entropy. Heat cools, matter disintegrates, memories fade. If we let them. 

Charles Nègre
[Photographer, b. 1820, Grasse, France, d. 1880, Cannes, France.]

 Photography does not form a separate, barren field of art. It is only a means of execution, uniform, rapid and sure, which serves the artist by reproducing with mathematical precision the form and effect of objects and even that poetry which at once arises from any harmonious combination. 

Laurel Nakadate
[Video artist and photographer, b. 1975, Austin, Texas, lives in New York.]

 Sometimes, photographs live in our hearts as unborn ghosts and we survive not because their shadows find permanence there, but because that thing that is larger than us, larger than the things we can point to, remember and claim, escorts us from dark into light...