Guillaume Apollinaire
[Poet and writer, b. 1880, Rome, d. 1918, Paris.]

 Your smile appeals as
might a flower.
Photograph you are the brown mushroom
in the forest
of her beauty.
The white spaces are
moonlight
in a peaceful garden
full of fountains and frenzied gardeners.
Photograph you are the smoke of the flame
of her beauty.
There are in you,
photograph, strains
of langorous music.
In you I hear
long melodies.
Photograph you are the shadow
cast by the sun
of her beauty. 

Nobuyoshi Araki
[Photographer, b. 1940, Tokyo, lives in Tokyo.]

 Photography is copying. 

Brooks Atkinson
[Writer and critic, b. 1894, Melrose, Massachusetts, d. 1984, New York.]

 The virtue of the camera is not the power it has to transform the photographer into an artist, but the impulse it gives him to keep on looking. 

Lynsey Addario
[Photographer, b. 1973, Norwalk, Connecticut, lives in Islington, England.]

 When I was behind a camera, it was the only place in the world I wanted to be. 

Michelangelo Antonioni
[Filmmaker, b. 1912, Ferrara, Italy, d. 2007, Rome.]

 We know that under the revealed image there is another one which is more faithful to reality, and under this one is yet another, and again another under this last one, down to the true image of that absolute, mysterious reality that nobody will ever see. Or perhaps, not until the decomposition of every image, of every reality. 

Abbas (Abbas Attar)
[Photographer, b. 1944, Iran, lives in Paris.]

 The choice was to think of oneself either as a photojournalist or an artist. It wasn’t out of humility that I called myself a photojournalist, but arrogance. I thought photojournalism was superior. 

Carl Andre
[Sculptor and writer, b. 1935, Quincy, Massachusetts, lives in New York.]

 I’m afraid we get a great deal of our exposure to art through magazines and through slides and I think this is dreadful, this is anti-art because art is direct experience with something in the world and photography is just a rumor, a kind of pornography of art. 

James Agee
[Writer, b. 1909, Knoxville, Tennessee, d. 1955, New York.]

 In the immediate world, everything is to be discerned... with the whole of consciousness, seeking to perceive it as it stands: so that the aspect of a street in sunlight can roar in the heart of itself as a symphony, perhaps as no symphony can: and all consciousness is shifted from the imagined, the revisive, to the effort to perceive simply the cruel radiance of what is.