Theodor Adorno
[Writer, b. 1903, Frankfurt, Germany, d. 1969, Visp, Switzerland.]

 There is something embarrassing in... the way in which, ... turning suffering into images, harsh and uncompromising though they are, ... wounds the shame we feel in the presence of the victims. For these victims are used to create something, works of art, that are thrown to the consumption of a world which destroyed them. 

Paul Almasy
[Photojournalist, b. 1906, Budapest, Hungary, d. 2003, Paris, France.]

 When I took photographs I never crouched down like a cat about to pounce on its prey. I never attacked with my camera. 

Paul Auster
[Writer, b. 1947, Newark, New Jersey, lives in Brooklyn, New York.]

 The pictures do not lie, but neither do they tell the whole story. They are merely a record of time passing, the outward evidence. 

Dudley Andrew
[Writer, critic, and curator, lives in New Haven, Connecticut.]

 Everything in the photo is potentially significant, even and especially, that which has escaped the control of the photographer pointing the camera. 

Diane Arbus
[Photographer, b. 1923, New York, d. 1971, New York.]

 I always thought of photography as a naughty thing to do—that was one of my favorite things about it, and when I first did it I felt very perverse. 

Eddie Adams
[Photojournalist, b. 1933, New Kensington, Pennsylvania, d. 2004, New York.]

 If it makes you laugh, if it makes you cry, if it rips out your heart, that’s a good picture. 

Pamela Anderson
[Actress and model, b. 1967, Ladysmith, British Columbia, Canada, lives in Los Angeles.]

 I like the experience of being in a shoot, and I’m a total exhibitionist, but I don’t like to look at them. 

Rosanna Arquette
[Actress, b. 1959, New York, lives in Hollywood.]

 I was in Florida with Bert Stern, the photographer who shot Marilyn Monroe on the beach with a sweater, and we smoked a joint. The bathing suit kept coming off in the water, and I just ripped it off.