Jack Kerouac (Jean-Louis Lebris de Kerouac)
[Writer, b. 1922, Lowell, Massachusetts, d. 1969, St. Petersburg, Florida.]

 How I wished I’d have had a camera of my own, a mad mental camera that could register pictorial shots, of the photographic artist himself prowling about for his ultimate shot—an epic in itself. (On the road with Robert Frank, 1958) 

Sarah Kember
[Writer and critic, lives in London.]

 A photograph of the pyramids is an image-idea of the pyramids, it is not the pyramids. 

Chris Killip
[Photographer, b. 1946, Douglas, Isle of Man, United Kingdom, lives in Boston.]

 I don’t like smiley pictures. A smile is a defense mechanism. It says, “You can’t have the real me but here’s my smile.” You get closer to the real person when they stop smiling. 

Germaine Krull
[Photographer, b. 1897, Wilda, East Prussia, Germany (now Poland), d. 1985, Wetzlar, Germany.]

 The camera need not invent, manipulate or fool. It does not paint, nor does it imagine. The photographer is a witness, the witness of his time. 

Rinko Kawauchi
[Photographer, b. 1972, Shiga, Japan, lives in Kanagawa, Japan.]

 It’s not that I’m confident, but I feel it’s okay for me to continue taking photos. 

André Kertész
[Photographer, b. 1894, Budapest, Hungary, d. 1985, New York.]

 I am not a surrealist. I am only a realist. All this group—surrealists—use my name. No, no, I am realist. 

Martin Luther King
[Civil rights leader, religious leader, b. 1929, Atlanta, Georgia, d. 1968, Memphis, Tennessee.]

 I’m not being cold blooded about it, but it is so much more important for you to take a picture of us getting beaten up than for you to be another person joining in the fray. (To photographer Flip Schulke at a civil rights march.) 

Ellsworth Kelly
[Artist, b. 1923, Newburgh, New York, d. 2015, Spencertown, New York.]

 I realized I didn’t want to compose pictures, I wanted to find them.