Antonin Kratochvil
[Photographer, b. 1947, Lovisice, Czechoslovakia, lives in New York.]

 I was repelled by the sleazy reality of the totalitarian countries: politicians were shameless. There were corruption, pollution, shoddy goods, long lines, and suicide everywhere, but the leaders kept boasting about their great achievements and bright tomorrows. I saw all this and tried to show it in my pictures as simply and straightforwardly as I could. All I wanted to do was record how all these poor people adapted to lies and suffering, how they got used to it, how, in fact they were bound to miss it when it was over. 

Søren Kierkegaard
[Philosopher, b. 1813, Copenhagen, Denmark, d. 1855, Copenhagen.]

 With the daguerreotype everyone will be able to have their portrait taken—formerly it was only the prominent; and at the same time everything is being done to make us all look exactly the same—so that we shall only need one portrait. 

Paul Klee
[Artist, b. 1879, Münchenbuchsee, Switzerland, d. 1940, Muralto-Locarno, Switzerland.]

 Art does not reproduce the visible; rather, it makes visible. 

Barbara Kruger
[Artist, b. 1945, Newark, New Jersey, lives in New York.]

 Photography has saturated us as spectators from its inception amidst a mingling of laboratorial pursuits and magic acts to its current status as propagator of convention, cultural commodity, and global hobby. 

Jerzy Kosinksi (Jerzy Lewinkopf)
[Writer, b. 1933, Lodz, Poland, d. 1991, New York.]

 In my photographs it is apparent that there was no posing at the moment I released the shutter. 

Les Krims
[Photographer, b. 1943, Brooklyn, New York, lives in Buffalo, New York.]

 It is possible to create any picture a person imagines. 

Martin Luther King
[Civil rights leader, religious leader, b. 1929, Atlanta, Georgia, d. 1968, Memphis, Tennessee.]

 I’m not being cold blooded about it, but it is so much more important for you to take a picture of us getting beaten up than for you to be another person joining in the fray. (To photographer Flip Schulke at a civil rights march.) 

William Klein
[Photographer, b. 1928, New York, lives in Paris.]

 Sometimes, I’d take shots without aiming, just to see what happened. I’d rush into crowds—bang! bang! ... It must be close to what a fighter feels after jabbing and circling and getting hit, when suddenly there’s an opening, and bang! Right on the button. It’s a fantastic feeling.