Kermit the Frog
[Muppet and Philosopher, b. 1955, WRC-TV, Washington, D.C., lives in Hollywood.]

 How important are the visual arts in our society? I feel strongly that the visual arts are of vast and incalculable importance. Of course I could be prejudiced. I am a visual art. 

André Kertész
[Photographer, b. 1894, Budapest, Hungary, d. 1985, New York.]

 Have confidence in the inventions and transformations of chance. 

Max Kozloff
[Critic, editor, and photographer, b. 1933, Chicago, Illinois, lives in New York.]

 Though infested with many bewildering anomalies, photographs are considered our best arbiters between our visual perceptions and the memory of them. It is not only their apparent ‘objectivity’ that grants photographs their high status in this regard, but our belief that in them, fugitive sensation has been laid to rest. 

Arthur Knight
[Writer and film critic, b. 1916, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, d. 1991, Sydney, Australia.]

 Through this bright world the photographer walks like a zombie, blind unless a camera is strapped around his neck. The one time he appears without it is when he visits the clearing at night and discovers there the corpse. His immediate reaction is to run home for his camera. Only in a photograph does reality become meaningful for him. (On the film “Blow-Up”) 

Ellsworth Kelly
[Artist, b. 1923, Newburgh, New York, d. 2015, Spencertown, New York.]

 I realized I didn’t want to compose pictures, I wanted to find them. 

Lincoln Kirstein
[Writer, critic, and impresario, b. 1907, Rochester, New York, d. 1996, New York.]

 The candid camera is the greatest liar in the photographic family.... It is anarchic, naïve, and superficial. 

Siegfried Kracauer
[Media critic and sociologist, b. 1889, Frankfurt, Germany, d. 1966, New York.]

 The photograph annihilates the person. 

Franz Kafka
[Writer, b. 1883, Prague, d. 1924, Prague.]

 Your sight does not master the pictures, it is the pictures that master your sight.