William Klein
[Photographer, b. 1928, New York, lives in Paris.]

 I have always loved the amateur side of photography, automatic photographs, accidental photographs with uncentered compositions, heads cut off, whatever. I incite people to make their self-portraits. I see myself as their walking photo booth. 

André Kertész
[Photographer, b. 1894, Budapest, Hungary, d. 1985, New York.]

 I am not a surrealist. I am only a realist. All this group—surrealists—use my name. No, no, I am realist. 

Alberto Korda
[Photographer, b. 1928, Havana, Cuba, d. 2001, Paris.]

 I remember it as if it were today... seeing him [Che] framed in the viewfinder, with that expression. I am still startled by the impact... it shakes me so powerfully. (On his iconic photo of Che Guevara) 

Idris Khan
[Artist, b. 1978, Birmingham, England, lives in London.]

 A lot of people in the art world hate to use the word “Photoshop” like it’s cheating or easy or something. I say bollocks to that. For me, it’s my tool, my paintbrush if you like, and lets me create my own visual language. 

Max Kozloff
[Critic, editor, and photographer, b. 1933, Chicago, Illinois, lives in New York.]

 Though infested with many bewildering anomalies, photographs are considered our best arbiters between our visual perceptions and the memory of them. It is not only their apparent ‘objectivity’ that grants photographs their high status in this regard, but our belief that in them, fugitive sensation has been laid to rest. 

Frieda Kahlo (Magdalena Carmen Frida Kahlo y Calderón)
[Artist, b. 1907, Mexico City, d. 1954, Mexico City.]

 When my father took my picture in 1932 after my accident, I knew that a battlefield of suffering was in my eyes. From then on, I started looking straight at the lens, unflinching, unsmiling, determined to show that I was a good fighter to the end. (On her father Guillermo Kahlo, 1871-1941, a photographer) 

Nick Knight
[Photographer, b. 1958, London, England, lives in London.]

 I think photography has been wrestling with a burden of telling the truth, which I don’t think it was ever particularly good at. 

Beyoncé Knowles
[Singer and celebrity, b. 1981, Houston, Texas, lives in New York.]

 When I’m on the red carpet, I’m prepared for [the attention.] But the worst thing is on planes, when you’re asleep and you’re woken up by a camera flashing. That’s a little bit much. But what do you do? It’s a part of [being famous]. Unfortunately.