Elke Krystufek
[Artist, b. 1970, Vienna, lives in Rotterdam and Vienna.]

 I decided to make my life a work of art. I have no private life. Everything is public. 

Nick Knight
[Photographer, b. 1958, London, England, lives in London.]

 I think photography has been wrestling with a burden of telling the truth, which I don’t think it was ever particularly good at. 

Antonin Kratochvil
[Photographer, b. 1947, Lovisice, Czechoslovakia, lives in New York.]

 I was repelled by the sleazy reality of the totalitarian countries: politicians were shameless. There were corruption, pollution, shoddy goods, long lines, and suicide everywhere, but the leaders kept boasting about their great achievements and bright tomorrows. I saw all this and tried to show it in my pictures as simply and straightforwardly as I could. All I wanted to do was record how all these poor people adapted to lies and suffering, how they got used to it, how, in fact they were bound to miss it when it was over. 

Martin Luther King
[Civil rights leader, religious leader, b. 1929, Atlanta, Georgia, d. 1968, Memphis, Tennessee.]

 I’m not being cold blooded about it, but it is so much more important for you to take a picture of us getting beaten up than for you to be another person joining in the fray. (To photographer Flip Schulke at a civil rights march.) 

Tibor Kalman
[Graphic designer, b. 1949, Budapest, d. 1999, Dorado, Puerto Rico.]

 I believe that this whole question of some photography being “true” and some “untrue” is a non-question. Photography is not objective; it never was objective. 

Frieda Kahlo (Magdalena Carmen Frida Kahlo y Calderón)
[Artist, b. 1907, Mexico City, d. 1954, Mexico City.]

 When my father took my picture in 1932 after my accident, I knew that a battlefield of suffering was in my eyes. From then on, I started looking straight at the lens, unflinching, unsmiling, determined to show that I was a good fighter to the end. (On her father Guillermo Kahlo, 1871-1941, a photographer) 

Josef Koudelka
[Photographer, b. 1938, Biskovice, Moravia, Czechoslovakia, lives in Paris.]

 I don’t like captions. I prefer people to look at my pictures and invent their own stories. 

Franz Kafka
[Writer, b. 1883, Prague, d. 1924, Prague.]

 Your sight does not master the pictures, it is the pictures that master your sight.