Ellsworth Kelly
[Artist, b. 1923, Newburgh, New York, d. 2015, Spencertown, New York.]

 I realized I didn’t want to compose pictures, I wanted to find them. 

Kim Kardashian
[Television personality and socialite, b. 1980, Los Angeles, lives in Hidden Hills, California.]

 Since choice or chance gave me a way of life without privacy, I’ll violate my privacy myself, and I’ll have a good time doing it, too. (On publishing Selfish, a 450-page book of selfies.) 

Beyoncé Knowles
[Singer and celebrity, b. 1981, Houston, Texas, lives in New York.]

 When I’m on the red carpet, I’m prepared for [the attention.] But the worst thing is on planes, when you’re asleep and you’re woken up by a camera flashing. That’s a little bit much. But what do you do? It’s a part of [being famous]. Unfortunately. 

Jack Kerouac (Jean-Louis Lebris de Kerouac)
[Writer, b. 1922, Lowell, Massachusetts, d. 1969, St. Petersburg, Florida.]

 How I wished I’d have had a camera of my own, a mad mental camera that could register pictorial shots, of the photographic artist himself prowling about for his ultimate shot—an epic in itself. (On the road with Robert Frank, 1958) 

Jiddu Krishnamurti
[Religious philosopher, b. 1885, Madanapalle, India, d. 1986, Ojai, California.]

 Relationship between human beings is based on the image-forming, defensive mechanism. In our relationships each of us builds an image about the other, and these two images have relationship, not the human beings themselves... 

Arthur Koestler
[Writer, b. 1905, Budapest, Hungary, d. 1983, London, England.]

 The “innocent eye” is a fiction, based on the absurd notion that what we perceive in the present can be isolated in the mind from the influence of past experience There is no perception of “pure form” but meaning seeps in, and settles on the image. 

Mark Klett
[Photographer, b. 1952, Albany, New York, lives in Tempe, Arizona.]

 Photos always seem to exist as sort of stuffy, unnecessary antiques that we put in a drawer—unless we take them out, put them in current dialogue, and give them relevance. 

André Kertész
[Photographer, b. 1894, Budapest, Hungary, d. 1985, New York.]

 I am not a surrealist. I am only a realist. All this group—surrealists—use my name. No, no, I am realist.