Abelardo Morell
[b. 1948, Havana, Cuba, lives in Brookline, Massachusetts.]

 The thing that makes me want to make pictures now is just looking without many prejudices. The stuff right under your eyes is the most wonderful universe—if you care to look with young eyes. 

Chuck Close
[Artist, b. 1940, Monroe, Washington, lives in New York.]

 ... I never said the camera was truth. It is, however, a more accurate and more objective way of seeing. 

Walker Evans
[Photographer, b. 1903, St. Louis, Missouri, d. 1975, New Haven, Connecticut.]

 Whether he is an artist or not, the photographer is a joyous sensualist, for the simple reason that the eye traffics in feelings, not in thoughts. 

Gordon Parks
[Photographer and filmmaker, b. 1912, Fort Scott, Kansas, d. 2006, New York.]

 I had known poverty firsthand, but there I learned how to fight its evil—along with the evil of racism—with a camera. 

David Burnett
[Photojournalist, b. 1946, Salt Lake City, Utah, lives in Arlington, Virginia.]

 I see myself as a recorder of history, sort of a visual historian. 

Arthur Tress
[Photographer, b. 1940, Brooklyn, New York, lives in Cambria, California.]

 Photography is my method for defining the confusing world that rushes constantly toward me. It is my defensive attempt to reduce our daily chaos to a set of understandable images. 

Paolo Pellegrin
[Photographer, b. 1964, Rome, lives in Paris.]

 I’m more interested in a photography that is “unfinished”—a photography that is suggestive and can trigger a conversation or dialogue. There are pictures that are closed, finished, to which there is no way in. 

Rankin (John Rankin Waddell)
[Photographer, b. 1966, Glasgow, Scotland, lives in London.]

 I use the technique of being cheeky or rude or asking [subjects] to do ridiculous things. For example, I might talk about my sex life, or their sex life… I might say, “I’m imagining you being fucked up the arse with a big black dildo.”