Gerhard Richter
[Artist, b. 1932, Dresden, lives in Düsseldorf.]

 The photograph is the only picture that can truly convey information, even if it is technically faulty and the object can barely be identified. A painting of a murder is of no interest whatever; but a photograph of a murder fascinates everyone. 

Henry Peach Robinson
[Photographer, b. 1830, Ludlow, Shropshire, England, d. 1901, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England.]

 ... any “dodge,” or trick, or conjuration of any kind is open to the photographer’s use so that it belongs to his art and is not false to nature. If the dodges, tricks, etc., lead the photographer astray, so much the worse for him; if they do not assist him to represent nature, he is not fit to use them. It is not the fault of the dodges, it is the fault of the bungler. 

Wilhelm Röntgen
[Physicist, b. 1845, Lennep, Germany, d. 1923, Weilheim, Germany.]

 For me photography was the means to the end, but they made it the most important thing. (On the discovery of X-ray photography.) 

Ronald Reagan
[Actor and politician, b. 1911, Tampico, Illinois, d. 2004, Bel Air, California.]

 I like photographers—you don’t ask questions. (To a gathering of the White House News Photographers Association) 

Salman Rushdie
[Writer, b. 1947, Bombay (now Mumbai), lives in New York.]

 A photograph is a moral decision taken in one eighth of a second, or one sixteenth, or one one-hundred-and-twenty-eighth. Snap your fingers; a snapshot’s faster. 

Bertrand Russell
[Philosopher and social critic, b. 1872, Trellech, Monmouthshire, England, d. 1970, Penrhyndeudraeth, Wales.]

 Memory demands an image. 

Jean Renoir
[Filmmaker, b. 1894, Paris, France, d. 1979, Beverly Hills, California.]

 I am against great themes and great subjects... You can’t film an idea. The camera is an instrument for recording physical impact. 

Eugene Richards
[Photographer, b. 1944, Dorchester, Massachusetts, lives in New York.]

 I can photograph someone if I can touch them.