Bertrand Russell
[Philosopher and social critic, b. 1872, Trellech, Monmouthshire, England, d. 1970, Penrhyndeudraeth, Wales.]

 Memory demands an image. 

Eva Rubinstein
[Photographer, b. 1933, Buenos Aires, Argentina, lives in New York and Paris.]

 After I have photographed the way I like to, I feel as I might if I had been making love all day, marvelous and exhausted and wanting to collapse on the floor in a heap. That’s why I can’t photograph just anybody, and why it’s so hard to photograph people on assignment; it’s like going to bed with someone not of my choosing. 

Jacob Riis
[Photographer and reformer, b. 1849, Denmark, d. 1914, Barre, Massachusetts.]

 I do not want [photography] explained to me in terms of... formulas, learned, but so hopelessly unsatisfying. I do not want my butterfly stuck on a pin and put in a glass case. I want to see the sunlight on its wings as it flits from flower to flower and I don’t care a rap what its Latin name may be. 

Walter Rosenblum
[Photographer, b. 1919, New York, d. 2006, New York.]

 A photographer doesn’t just copy reality, but communicates to others what he or she experiences. 

Joe Rosenthal
[Photographer, b. 1911, Washington, D.C., d. 2006, Novato, California.]

 Had I posed that shot, I would, of course, have ruined it. I’d have picked fewer men... I would also have made them turn their heads so that they could be identified for AP members throughout the country and nothing like the existing picture would have resulted. (On his photograph of U.S. Marines raising the American flag on Mt. Suribachi, Iwo Jima.) 

Herb Ritts
[Photographer, b. 1952, Los Angeles, d. 2002, Los Angeles.]

 To me it’s just going for the moment that counts. Sometimes, I’ll have all the elements there, and I like to play and push something, and to me, in the end, you do achieve things that you’re not aware of in the beginning, even though you’re there trying to get them. 

George Rodger
[Photojournalist, b. 1908, Hale, Cheshire, England, d. 1995, Smarden, Kent, England.]

 When I discovered that I could look at the horror of Belsen—4,000 dead and starving lying around—and think only of a nice photographic composition, I knew something had happened to me and it had to stop. 

Willy Ronis
[Photographer, b. 1910, Montmartre, Paris, d. 2009, Paris.]

 We do not see what is “real,” we see what we are.