Edward Weston
[Photographer, b. 1886, Highland Park, Illinois, d. 1958, Wildcat Hill, California.]

 The photograph isolates and perpetuates a moment of time: an important and revealing moment, or an unimportant and meaningless one, depending upon the photographer's understanding of his subject and mastery of his process. 
 Now to consult the rules of composition before making a picture is a little like consulting the law of gravitation before going for a walk. 
 To see the Thing itself is essential: the quintessence revealed direct without the fog of impressionism... This then: to photograph a rock, have it look like a rock, but be more than a rock. Significant presentation—not interpretation. 
 When subject matter is forced to fit into preconceived patterns, there can be no freshness of vision. Following rules of composition can only lead to a tedious repetition of pictorial clichés. 
 My own eyes are no more than scouts on a preliminary search, for the camera’s eye may entirely change my idea. 
 To compose a subject well means no more than to see and present it in the strongest manner possible. 
 For photography is a way to capture the moment—not just any moment, but the important one, this one moment out of all time when your subject is revealed to the fullest—that moment of perfection which comes once and is not repeated. 
 A photograph has no value unless it looks exactly like a photograph and nothing else. 
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