Alfredo Jarr
[Artist, b. 1956, Santiago, Chile, lives in New York.]

 As we all know, the objective and mission of the photojournalist is to show us the reality of the world. And in order to capture that reality, they go to dangerous and tragic places at the expense of their lives. I see them as the conscience of our humanity; they represent for me what is left of our humanity. 

Weegee (Usher Fellig)
[Photographer, b. 1899, Zlothew near Lemberg, Austrian Galicia (now Zolochiv, Ukraine), d. 1968, New York.]

 I would arrive at midnight, the cop at the information desk would be dozing... The police Teletype machine would be singing a song of crime and violence... Crime was my oyster, and I liked it. 

Jock Sturges
[Photographer, b. 1947, New York, lives in San Francisco.]

 People need to realize that a cultural war has been declared here. A virulent, aggressive minority has decided that Americans don’t know themselves what it is they should see, and need to be protected by people who are wiser than they are, even if they are only a tiny sliver of the population. This represents a whole new level of attention to the arts by repressive forces. It’s very scary, and it has to be withstood. 

Dorothea Lange
[Photographer, b. 1895, Hoboken, New Jersey, d. 1965, San Francisco.]

 For better or worse, the destiny of the photographer is bound up with the destinies of a machine. In this alliance is presented a very special problem. Ours is a time of the machine, and ours is a need to know that the machine can be put to creative human effort. If it is not, the machine can destroy us. It is within the power of the photographer to help prohibit destruction, and help make the machine an agent more of good than evil. 

Victor Burgin
[Artist and writer, b. 1941, Sheffield, England, lives in London.]

 To remain long with a single image is to risk the loss of our imaginary command of the look, to relinquish it to that absent other to whom it belongs by right—the camera. The image then no longer received our look, reassuring us of our founding centrality, it rather, as it were, avoids our gaze, confirming its allegiance to the other. 

Larry Burrows
[Photographer, b. 1926, London, d. 1971, Laos.]

 Do I have the right to carry on working and leave a man suffering? To my mind, the answer is no, you have got to help him... You cannot go through these elements without, obviously feeling something yourself—you cannot be mercenary in this way because it will make you less of a photographer... 

Christo (Christo Vladimirov Javacheff)
[Artist, b. 1935, Gabrova, Bulgaria, lives in New York.]

 Two Nazi commandos defended the Reichstag like mad, step by step, floor by floor, with the same lack of purpose as the Russians who lost two thousand men in attempting to take hold of it. I have the feeling that they were sacrificed for a mere photograph, the famous photograph of the Russian soldier waving the Soviet flag on the roof of the Reichstag. 

Philip Jones Griffiths
[Photojournalist, b. 1936, Rhuddian, Wales, d. 2008, London.]

 What we get to think and know about the world is in the hands of a very few... A truly informed public is antithetical to the interests of modern consumer capital. 
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