Luc Delahaye
[Photographer, b. 1962, Tours, France, lives in Paris.]

 I was twenty when I discovered war and photography. I can’t say that I wanted to bear witness and change the world. I had no good moral reasons: I just loved adventure, I loved the poetry of war, the poetry of chaos, and I found that there was a kind of grace in weaving between the bullets. 

Guillaume Apollinaire
[Poet and writer, b. 1880, Rome, d. 1918, Paris.]

 Your smile appeals as
might a flower.
Photograph you are the brown mushroom
in the forest
of her beauty.
The white spaces are
moonlight
in a peaceful garden
full of fountains and frenzied gardeners.
Photograph you are the smoke of the flame
of her beauty.
There are in you,
photograph, strains
of langorous music.
In you I hear
long melodies.
Photograph you are the shadow
cast by the sun
of her beauty. 

Philip Larkin
[Poet and writer, b. 1922, Coventry, England, d. 1985, London.]

 At last you yielded up the album, which
Once open, sent me distracted. All your ages
Matt and glossy on the thick black pages!
Too much confectionery, too rich:
I choke on such nutritious images.  

Harry Callahan
[Photographer, b. 1912, Detroit, Michigan, d. 1999, Atlanta, Georgia.]

 If you choose your subject selectively—intuitively—the camera can write poetry. 

Samuel Beckett
[Writer, b. 1906, Foxrock, Dublin, Ireland, d. 1989, Paris.]

 I still smile it’s not worth the trouble any more
for a long time now it’s not been worth the trouble
the tongue spring goes into the mud I stay like
this not thirsty any more the tongue goes back into
the mouth it closes it has to make a straight line
now it’s done I’ve made the image. 

Thomas Roma
[Photographer, b. 1950, Brooklyn, New York, lives in Brooklyn.]

 Straight photography, following the medium, is intoxicating—trying to wrestle it into the form of a poem. 
quotes 73-78 of 78
first page previous page page 10 of 10
display quotes