Susan Sontag
[Writer, theorist, and critic, b. 1933, New York, d. 2004, New York.]

 To remember is, more and more, not to recall a story but to be able to call up a picture. 

W.G Sebald
[Writer, b. 1944, Bavaria, Germany, d. 2001, East Anglia, England.]

 One has the impression that something is stirring inside [photographs]—it is as if one can hear little cries of despair, gémissements de désespoir... as if the photographs themselves had a memory and were remembering us and how we, the surviving, and those who preceded us, once were. 

Roland Barthes
[Writer, critic, and theorist, b. 1915, Cherbourg, d. 1980, Paris.]

 Not only is the Photograph never, in essence, a memory... but it actually blocks memory, quickly becomes a counter-memory. 

Sally Mann
[Photographer, b. 1951, Lexington, Virginia, lives in Lexington.]

 I don’t have a memory of [my father]; I have a memory of a photograph. 
 I believe that photographs actually rob us of our memory. 

Franz Kafka
[Writer, b. 1883, Prague, d. 1924, Prague.]

 We photograph things in order to drive them out of our minds. 

A.D. Coleman
[Critic and writer, b. 1943, New York, lives in New York.]

 The past is always with us, in the form of our photographs, which we feel as we might a rosary, wearing them smooth with the fingering of our eyes. 

Sally Mann
[Photographer, b. 1951, Lexington, Virginia, lives in Lexington.]

 Photography would seem to preserve our past and make it invulnerable to the distortions of repeated memorial superimpositions, but I think that is a fallacy: photographs supplant and corrupt the past, all the while creating their own memories. 
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