David Wojnarowicz
[Artist and activist, b. 1954, Redbank, New Jersey, d. 1990, New York.]

 No one can really explain in a rational way what makes a good photograph or a bad photograph... This is why the art world will not throw billions of dollars at photography the way it has at painting; and that is what makes it an exciting medium. 

Harry Callahan
[Photographer, b. 1912, Detroit, Michigan, d. 1999, Atlanta, Georgia.]

 I just don’t know what makes a picture, really—the thing that makes it is something unique, as far as I can understand. Just like one guy can write a sentence and it’s beautiful and another one can write it and it’s dead. What the difference is, I don’t know. 

Anton Corbijn
[Photographer, b. 1955, Strijen, Netherlands, lives in London.]

 I’m a very, very basic photographer. The main strength of my pictures, I guess, is the mood and feel I get out of the people that I meet. But technically I don’t think I’m very advanced. That never interested me. 

Grant Mudford
[Photographer, b. 1944, Sydney, Australia, lives in Los Angeles.]

 One of the magical things about photography is the transformation that takes place when you photograph something. Something that inherently has very little going for it in terms of the interest you take in it, can become infinitely more interesting when rendered as a photograph. It’s no longer a building. It’s a photograph. 

Ralph Waldo Emerson
[Writer and thinker, b. 1803, Boston, Massachusetts, d. 1882, Concord, Massachusetts.]

 No man quarrels with his shadow, nor will he when the sun was the painter. Here is no interference, and the distortions are not the blunders of an artist. 

Robert Rauschenberg
[Artist, b. 1925, Port Arthur, Texas, d. 2008, Captiva Island, Florida.]

 I don’t crop. Photography is like diamond cutting. If you miss you miss. 

David Octavius Hill
[Photographer, b. 1802, Perth, Scotland, d. 1870, Newington, Scotland.]

 The rough surface and unequal texture throughout of the paper is the main cause of the Calotype failing in details before the process of Daguerreotypy—and this is the very life of it. They look like the imperfect work of man—and not the much diminished perfect work of God. (1848) 

Ansel Adams
[Photographer, b. 1902, San Francisco, d. 1984, Carmel, California.]

 I expect to retire to a fine-grained heaven where the temperatures are always consistent, where the images slide before ones eyes in a continual cascade of form and meaning. 
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