Alec Soth
[Photographer, b. 1969, Minneapolis, Minnesota, lives in Saint Paul, Minnesota.]

 I’ve never been comfortable photographing people I know, myself included. I guess I prefer the mystery of strangers. 

Juergen Teller
[Photographer, b. 1964, Erlangen, Germany, lives in London.]

 Everything in a wide sense is a kind of a self-portrait. It’s just the way you see things and you’re curious about certain things and just excited about them. 

Ulay (Frank Uwe Laysiepen)
[Performance artist, b. 1943, Solingen, Germany, lives in Amsterdam.]

 Being a Polaroid photographer I started to use myself as a model or an object for identity investigation. As I had no background information on my family and relatives, at one stage I just wanted to know who I actually am. 

Lucas Samaras
[Artist, b. 1936, Kastoria, Greece, lives in New York.]

 ...I started photographing myself, and found that I could see portions of myself that I had never seen before. Since I face just my face in the mirror, I know pretty much what it’s like. When I see a side-view I’m not used to it, and find it peculiar... So, photographing myself and discovering unknown territories of my surface self causes an interesting psychological confrontation. 

Philip K. Dick
[Writer, b. 1928, Chicago, Illinois, d. 1982, Santa Ana, California.]

 When do I see a photograph, when a reflection? 

Eleanor Antin
[Artist, b. 1935, New York, lives in San Diego, California.]

 Why should I be limited by my own biography? 

Lucas Samaras
[Artist, b. 1936, Kastoria, Greece, lives in New York.]

 At any rate, when I began photographing myself, I could place myself in poses that had not been investigated by other artists. It was an area other artists hadn't touched. Then, I went on from there. I manipulated my image—distorting it, brutalizing it. People thought I was mad, but I felt I had to tell these things. It gave me a kind of excitement. 

Hippolyte Bayard
[Photographer, b. 1801, Breteuil-sur-Noye, France, d. 1887, Nemours, France.]

 The corpse which you see here is that of M. Bayard, inventor of the process that has just been shown to you. As far as I know this indefatigable experimenter has been occupied for about three years with his discovery. The Government, which has been only too generous to Monsieur Daguerre, has said it can do nothing for Monsieur Bayard, and the poor wretch has drowned himself. Oh the vagaries of human life...! (1840, written on his self-portrait as a drowned man made after he was beaten to the announcement of the discovery of photography by Louis-Jacques Mandé Daguerre.) 
quotes 81-88 of 91
first page previous page page 11 of 12 next page last page
display quotes