Charles Baudelaire
[Writer, b. 1821, Paris, d. 1867, Paris.]

 ... the photographic industry was the refuge of every would-be painter, every painter too ill-endowed or too last to complete his studies, this universal infatuation bore not only the mark of a blindness, an imbecility, but also had the air of a vengeance. I do not believe, or at least I do not wish to believe, in the absolute success of such a brutish conspiracy, in which, as in all others, one finds both fools and knaves; bit I am convinced that the ill-applied developments of photography, like all other purely material developments of progress, have contributed much to the impoverishment of French artistic genius, which is already so scarce. (1859) 
 In the domain of painting and statuary, the present-day credo of the worldly wise, especially in France, is this: ... “I believe that art is, and can only be, the exact reproduction of nature...” An avenging God has heard the prayers of this multitude; Daguerre was his messiah. 
 A good picture, which is the faithful equivalent of the dream which has begotten it, should be brought into being like a world. 
 I would very much like to have a photograph of you... [but] I must be there. You know nothing about them, and all photographers, even the best, have ridiculous mannerisms. They think it is a good photograph if warts, wrinkles, and every defect and triviality of the face are made visible and exaggerated; and the HARDER the image is, the more they are pleased. (1865, To his mother) 
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